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2017 FSP Courses

The First Seminar (or FSP for short) is a small seminar-style class that all entering first-year students take during their first semester at TCNJ. The course enables entering students to work closely with a professor and their fellow students on a topic of their choosing outside of their major. It offers students an opportunity to engage in an intellectually exciting and challenging experience at the beginning of their college career.

Instructions

  1. Students in the Honors, Bonner, or W.I.L.L. program should go to the  “Honors” or “Bonner/W.I.L.L.” page for their program and follow the directions there; do not follow the directions below.
  2. Some departments and schools give specific advice on how to choose your FSP course.  Please check the “Major Specific FSP Info” page before picking your FSP.
  3. From the list of FSP courses, please pick six sections that interest you.
  4. Once you have chosen six FSP sections, please put them in your First Semester Worksheet.
  5. Your FSPs choices will not be ranked when entered into the First Semester Worksheet. One of your choices will be assigned to you as your FSP.

ClassName/DescriptionInstructorCivic Responsibility
FSP 162-06

What Does it Mean to Be American?



This class will probe historical and contemporary debates about what it means to be an American citizen from the perspectives of law, politics, and culture. We review the concept of citizenship as it was adopted by the founders of the United States from the Greeks, and as it evolved through debates over the Constitution, and other relevant laws and court cases. We will examine the ways in which race, ethnicity, gender, religion, national origin, class and slave or free status have served as ways of defining or limiting citizenship rights. We will also review contemporary debates over immigration, terrorism and mass incarceration affect our understanding of the rights and responsibilities of citizens.

Course #: FSP 162-06
Professor: Pearson, Kim
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 9:30 - 10:50AM
Pearson, KimRace and Ethnicity
FSP 162-04

Applied Theatre



In this course we will study plays that document real life experiences, practice collaborative approaches, write original work, devise and perform a theatre project, and practice improvisational acting skills. This course will be interesting and valuable to anyone who thinks about the social and cultural realities of our world and would like to examine them more deeply through theatre.

Course #: FSP 162-04
Professor: Dell'Angelo, Tabitha
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 - 10:50AM
Dell'Angelo, TabithaRace and Ethnicity
FSP 161-33

Corrupting the Youth: The Power of Philosophy



The Ancient Greek philosopher Socrates was convicted by the Athenian state, and subsequently executed, on the charge of 'corrupting the youth'. What made the status quo in Athens nervous was that Socrates, through his philosophical method, taught the young people to think logically, thus how to think for themselves. In this class, we will learn how this is done; we will learn how to debate and argue philosophically, and also learn how this can be a powerful practical tool that can stay with you your entire life. I can't promise that anybody will be arrested for being a threat to the status quo, but you will learn how to shake up assumptions about knowledge and reality, how to question beliefs and opinions about right and wrong, and (of course) how to really fight your corner with all those non-philosophical civilians!

Course #: FSP 161-33
Professor: Preti, Consuelo
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 - 1:50PM
Preti, Consuelo
FSP 164-08

Conceptions of the Cosmos



This course will consider fundamental questions about the universe we live in. How big is the universe? How old is it? What is it made of? How did it form and change? Students will consider, in an historical context, philosophical and scientific thoughts about the universe as a whole, a subject we call cosmology. Peoples in ancient civilizations around the world (e.g., Mesopotamia, China, India, Egypt, Mesoamerica) pondered these key questions and some of their creation stories will be explored. Scientists have also been exploring these questions using the scientific method and we will discuss the evolution of these conceptions of the cosmos. The course will end with non-mathematical discussions of modern ideas about the universe, such as the dominance of dark matter and dark energy and the possibility of the existence of multiverses: other parallel universes.

Course #: FSP 164-08
Professor: Wiita, Paul
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 - 10:50AM
Wiita, PaulGlobal
FSP 161-20

Incarceraction Nation: Literature of the Prison



This course will explore the literature by and about prisoners from 600 AD to the present. Interdisciplinary in nature, this seminar will weave together the studies of gender, criminology, psychology, sociology, history and culture. We will read provocative, groundbreaking texts written by one of the most neglected, silenced, but all-too-critical sectors of our population—the incarcerated.

Course #: FSP 161-20
Professor: Tarter, Michelle
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11 - 12:20PM
Tarter, Michelle
FSP 161-39

Themes in Graphic Literature



Graphic literature is often dismissed as “comic books.” However, in the last thirty years, graphic literature has been elevated to tell stories as varied as the Islamic Revolution in Iran and the coming-of-age of a lesbian teenager from Pennsylvania. In this seminar, we will explore both traditional superhero comics and graphic novels for unifying themes and cultural context.

Course #: FSP 161-39
Professor: Hargreaves, Laura
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 3:30 - 4:50PM
Hargreaves, Laura
FSP 163-01

Academic Satire



Authors from Aristophanes to Stephen Colbert have used satire to poke fun at academics and their institutions. In plays, poems, narrative fiction, comics, TV shows and movies, authors have gotten audiences to laugh at and wonder about the people and practices that comprise higher education. The tone might range from light-hearted to mean-spirited with intentions that appear aimed at reform, revision, or revenge. This course will engage students in reading and viewing some of the most influential works of academic satire with an eye toward finding commonalities among major works as well as the specific difference that help certain authors and works stand out from the crowd while paying attention to depictions of gender as they occur in academic satires.

Course #: FSP 163-01
Professor: McGee, Tim
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30 - 8:20PM
McGee, TimGender
FSP 161-49

Are We What We Eat? Food, Culture and Identity



In 1825, French attorney, politician and gastronome Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin wrote, "Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are." In this course, we will consider the connection between what we eat and who we are as we explore themes of gastronomy. We will examine how our food and eating choices have shaped and preserved individual and cultural identities throughout history. We will investigate the power and meaning of food using historical, social-anthropological, and political lenses. Through critical reading of academic and popular literature, thoughtful viewing of visual materials, classroom discussion, and community engaged learning, we will study the relationship between the food we eat and our sense of individual and cultural identity and take a broad look at how food shapes us and our culture.

Course #: FSP 161-49
Professor: Roe, Lisa
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11 - 12:20PM
Roe, Lisa
FSP 161-11

Prosperity and Rational Optimism



For nearly all of human history, global poverty was the norm. Living standards began to improve only about 200 years ago. Since then, they’ve rocketed upward in many places around the world. What factors are responsible for beginning this unprecedented march of human progress? In this course, we’ll explore the causes of modern prosperity and rational reasons to be optimistic about the future. The goal is to counter political, media, and academic biases toward pessimism that can lead people to take human progress for granted, to fabricate or exaggerate problems, and to propose solutions that threaten to kill the goose that lays the golden eggs. Sustaining a widely shared prosperity requires informed vigilance to preserve rather than erode the foundations of this remarkable historical anomaly.

Course #: FSP 161-11
Professor: Ruscio, John
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 9:30 - 10:50AM
Ruscio, John
FSP 161-67

Alternative Medicine



Students will develop an understanding of what constitutes the traditional approach to medical care in the United States, and several alternative approaches. Some are common in the US (chiropractic, physical therapy, acupuncture, mental-health counseling), or ascendant (nutrition, supplements), and some much more in other countries (naturopathic, probiotics). They will learn how to take a holistic approach to health and illness, including side effects as well as direct effects, and assess long-term consequences as well as short-term benefits of health interventions.

Course #: FSP 161-67
Professor: Naples, Michele
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 9:30 - 10:50AM
Naples, Michele
FSP 161-04

The Hero and Trauma



In Judith Greenberg's edited collection (also the course textbook), Trauma at Home, she writes, “Inasmuch as silence overwhelms us, we yearn to return to dialogue." The Hero and Trauma FSP hopes to continue this dialogue by redefining the cultural definitions of "hero," "trauma," and "the post-traumatic self." While the hero’s journey includes a trajectory from death to redemption, our post 9/11 heroes offer a different kind of traumatic past. Whether it is based from helplessness, chaotic behaviors, unethical decisions, or lack of control over their bodies, our postmodern heroes walk a blurred line between good and evil. Our goal is not to keep with the stereotypical image of "hero," but to use it as a way to show strength and resiliency as we chart the journey from traumatic event to post-traumatic self. This course will explore the origin stories and behaviors of famous heroes such as Batman and the other citizens of Gotham City, the Avengers, Spiderman, Katniss Everdeen, Olivia Benson, and Harry Potter using a post 9/11 lens. Lesser known, but equally important, heroes found in Persepolis, Maus, Perks of Being a Wallflower, Adventure Time, Doctor Who, and Pushing Daisies will be thrown into the mix as newer heroes who must make tough decisions in a world similar to ours. Issues to be explored will include: How does a hero’s postmodern condition teach us to explore our own fatal flaws? How do we, as individuals and as a culture, define and respond to trauma? How can the process of collective mourning in real-life events help us to connect to imaginary dystopian worlds? What is the autoethnographic line between personal narrative and cultural narrative? Discussions will draw from mythological and literary conversations as well as gender, history, and cultural studies. Through a series of popular culture artifacts, first person narratives, and various types of creative, students will chart the growth of various protagonists - both real and imagined - as they begin to heal from their respective traumatic events within the cultural narrative of our postmodern, post 9/11 world.

Course #: FSP 161-04
Professor: Atzeni, Samantha
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 7 - 8:20PM
Atzeni, Samantha
FSP 162-01

Making Lemons out of Lemonade-Black Protest Music in the 20 & 21st Century



This FSP will focus on gender and race in the genre of music. Central to the course will be to trace the evolution of black protest music from the Civil Rights Era through to the 21st century. The course will examine the origins of black protest music as well a highlight the ways black activist used music to unite and also to speak out against racial, gender and economic injustice. Several musical artists will be highlighted throughout the semester, some of the artists highlighted will be: Billie Holiday, Nina Simone, Harry Belafonte, NWA, Beyonce. In addition to core texts the course will also  utilize songs and performances as texts to examine various social and political issues.

Course #: FSP 162-01
Professor: Adair, Zakiya
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 3:30 - 4:50PM
Adair, ZakiyaRace and Ethnicity
FSP 164-05

Introduction to Amateur Radio



This course will cover the history of communications leading to the birth of amateur radio and the historic development of the hobby. It will also cover radio amateur's contributions to the advancement of electronics technology and in public service. Special facets of the hobby such as digital communications/use of the Internet/WiFi, space communications and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) will be discussed. The basic electronics and regulations needed for an amateur radio license will be provided. Everyone attending the course should leave with an amateur radio license.

Course #: FSP 164-05
Professor: Katz, Allen
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 5:30 - 6:50PM
Katz, AllenGlobal
FSP 162-05

From Ballet to Jookin: Dance as an Art Form



"Ballet, modern dance, tap, jazz, aerial, hip-hop, jookin, krumping. What is dance? In this FSP students will be engaged in this question through watching videos of performances by professional dance companies, reading about the creative processes of choreographers and dancers, and writing about the styles of various dance companies, choreographers, and dancers. The focus will be on "art dance," i.e., dance that is intended for performance and performed for the most part by trained dancers, not folk dancing or recreational dancing (although the influences of these will be examined). The course will be organized by topics such as the differences between ballet and modern dance; the influences of African and Afro-Caribbean dance on Western dance forms; the influence of jazz on ballet; how ballet came to be, and how other dance forms developed. Readings will include biographies/autobiographies of both dancers and choreographers, and non-fiction books/articles that discuss the art of the dance. Choreographers to be discussed include George Balanchine, Jerome Robbins, Alvin Ailey, Martha Graham, Paul Taylor, Pearl Primus, Katherine Dunham, Donald McKayle, Rennie Harris, Bill T. Jones, and Lil Buck."

Course #: FSP 162-05
Professor: Dell, Amy
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2 - 3:20PM
Dell, AmyRace and Ethnicity
FSP 161-08

The Arts as a Force for Social Change: American Movers and Shakers Since 1900



By taking a close look at major movements of the 20th century in fine art, dance, and film, in this course we will explore the ways in which artists have confronted social injustice and developed a language unique to their form and vision to create awareness and inspire change. From entertainment to protest, art has been used in a variety of ways on stages and buildings, in the street, museums, and books, to unite, incite, and teach. We’ll evaluate whether art is “plagiarism or revolution,†as Gauguin proposed, the vision behind the creative act, and to what degree artists both reflect and shape culture. Our study will also allow us to address the limitations and benefits of technology, the effectiveness of art as a force for social change, and the possibilities for expression and impact through multimedia art. The class may involve a CEL component in Trenton, tbd.

Course #: FSP 161-08
Professor:Deaver, Karen
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 12:30 - 1:50PM
Deaver, Karen
FSP 163-07

Gender and the Workplace



Studying gender and the workplace offers students the opportunity to learn about modern day strategies related to hiring practices, fast track recruiting and overall areas of inclusion. As gender crosses a multitude of areas (age, class, and race, military and (dis)abilities, this provides great opportunity to engage in dynamic and energetic conversations (inclusive of social trends and personal experiences). Additional, ethical and legal standards, as well as stereotypical practices will be reviewed. Students completing this course will: 1. Analyze and discuss gender communication styles and how it related to the workforce. 2. Understand and articulate their own career interests and aspirations. 3. Understand gender and gender equity related to today’s job market. 4. Defining gender as it relates to the workplace.

Course #: FSP 163-07
Professor: Harris, Lynette
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Harris, Lynette N. Gender
FSP 161-38

Social Media and Hashtag Activism



The course will explore the impact that social media (SM) has on political decision-making and makers. First, we will establish definitions for such constructs as social media and activism. The course will then trace the origins of hashtag activism and look at some of the most effective examples of social media’s influence on policymakers. Our journey includes the various ways social activism is displayed on different SM platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat, MarcoPolo, etc), and will include a consideration of the best practices in this area. Students will actively engage in studying a social media activism case on their favorite subject, and they will (theoretically) develop a campaign for SM activism on a topic of strong interest.

Course #: FSP 161-38
Professor: Rouse, LaMont
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 - 1:50PM
Rouse, LaMont
FSP 161-32

Corrupting the Youth: The Power of Philosophy



The Ancient Greek philosopher Socrates was convicted by the Athenian state, and subsequently executed, on the charge of 'corrupting the youth'. What made the status quo in Athens nervous was that Socrates, through his philosophical method, taught the young people to think logically, thus how to think for themselves. In this class, we will learn how this is done; we will learn how to debate and argue philosophically, and also learn how this can be a powerful practical tool that can stay with you your entire life. I can't promise that anybody will be arrested for being a threat to the status quo, but you will learn how to shake up assumptions about knowledge and reality, how to question beliefs and opinions about right and wrong, and (of course) how to really fight your corner with all those non-philosophical civilians!

Course #: FSP 161-32
Professor: Preti, Consuelo
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11 - 12:20PM
Preti, Consuelo
FSP 161-22

The Necessity of Theater



Is theatre still necessary in the age of new media? Do we need theatre and performance to help provide an understanding of the world in which we live and the life that we inhabit? In this seminar, we will explore these questions (with a little help from Plato and Aristotle) before reading and viewing several classic and contemporary plays and musicals, each characterizing a different dramatic viewpoint or style of theatrical representation. In addition to class discussion of the plays and relevant readings, students will participate in a field trip to attend a professional production and meet with its production team, write two analytical essays, participate in a formal online discussion, and complete several brief writing exercises that explore the nature of academic writing. (This is a theatre appreciation course, not a performance-based or acting course; no prior knowledge of theatre is required or expected).

Course #: FSP 161-22
Professor: Muller, David
Day/s & Time/s: TR: 5:30 - 6:50PM
Muller, David G.
FSP 161-36

Morality of Markets



Should we buy and sell sex, kidneys, human eggs and sperm, or votes? Should women be allowed to rent out their wombs to infertile couples, or prisoners be allowed to pay for "upgraded" prison cells? Should we condemn or condone the use of sweatshop labor? Should businesses be allowed to discriminate based on race, or gender, or sexual orientation? Should there be any moral limits to markets--or should everything be for sale? This class will address all of these issues, and more.

Course #: FSP 161-36
Professor: Taylor, James
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 - 1:50PM
Taylor, James
FSP 161-37

Morality of Markets



Should we buy and sell sex, kidneys, human eggs and sperm, or votes? Should women be allowed to rent out their wombs to infertile couples, or prisoners be allowed to pay for "upgraded" prison cells? Should we condemn or condone the use of sweatshop labor? Should businesses be allowed to discriminate based on race, or gender, or sexual orientation? Should there be any moral limits to markets--or should everything be for sale? This class will address all of these issues, and more.

Course #: FSP 161-37
Professor: Taylor, James
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 - 10:50
Taylor, James
FSP 161-41

Gaming Literacy



In Manifesto for a Ludic Century, game designer Eric Zimmerman argues that in order to be truly literate in the 21st century, each of us needs to have “gaming literacy”. What does it mean to have such literacy? How can/should we use it? Is it as necessary as Zimmerman suggests? To get to the bottom of these questions and more, we’ll examine a variety of games from design, aesthetic, cultural and sociopolitical perspectives. We’ll read and discuss essays from scholars who study games and game culture. We’ll also design games, play them with each other, and reflect on our experiences through writing and presentation. All of this with the following goal in mind: to better “read” games and play.

Course #: FSP 161-41
Professor: Fishburn, Josh
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2 - 3:20PM
Fishburn, Josh
FSP 161-40

Human Ability Unplugged



“Disability is not a 'brave struggle’ or 'courage in the face of adversity’ . . . disability is an art. It’s an ingenious way to live.” – Neil Marcus – This quote by Neil Marcus reflects the central focus of this seminar regarding the study of human ability and the struggle among people perceived as more different than alike. Mr. Marcus is a poet, humorist, writer, actor and a self proclaimed adventurer who is creatively endowed with disability. His disability denies his ability to speak, stand, walk and/or control sudden and bizarre movements. The study of disability as a key aspect of human experience equal with race, class, gender, sex, and sexual orientation is explored through an alternate post modern paradigm that views difference from a variety of angles. The course commences and terminates with an attempt to define “Human-ness” or the parameters of what makes us “human.” This is compared to the human variability that we experience in our societies, communities and civilizations. This study of ability has important political, social, and economic import for society as a whole, including both disabled and non-disabled people.

Course #: FSP 161-40
Professor: Petroff, Jerry
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 - 10:50AM
Petroff, Jerry
FSP 162-03

The Politics and Pedagogy of the Civil Rights Movement: Citizenship schools, Freedom Schools and Community Schools



This course aims to engage students in a dialogue about the relationship between politics and pedagogy during America's long civil rights movement, and, about how this relationship manifests itself in the formal and informal cultural institutions of the times, especially schools. Focus is given to three school forms that emerged during this period in different geographical areas: Citizenship schools, Summer Freedom schools and the Community schools. One expected outcome of this course is that students adopt new lenses through which to view cultural institutions in history and in current times.

Course #: FSP 162-03
Professor: Palmer, Ruth
Day/s & Time/s: R: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Palmer, Ruth, J.Race and Ethnicity
FSP 161-09

Conflicts in Morality: Technology and Ethics



By considering six major themes during this course, students will gain an understanding of the major ethical dilemmas technological changes and innovation has had. Students will also have the opportunities to conduct a serious investigation of an area of personal interest relating to one of these topics. In the course of considering the ethical implications of technologies, students will become acquainted with major ethical theories. They will use these theories to attempt to resolve difficult ethical problems raised through technological transformations.

Course #: FSP 161-09
Professor: Friedman, Max
Day/s & Time/s: T: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Friedman, Max
FSP 161-68

How College Works: Higher Education and American Society



​The discussion about college in your family over the last year was personal: which college would you choose (and which ones would choose you), who was going to pay for your education, and what did you intend to study? There is widespread public debate about these issues too. Access to college, the costs of attendance, and the value of a degree are all being questioned by business and nonprofit executives, politicians, and educators. We examine this public debate about higher education; a debate that has intensified as the importance of college for individual success has increased and the resources available for higher education become more scarce.

Course #: FSP 161-68
Professor: Prensky, David
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2 - 3:20PM
Prensky, David
FSP 161-59

Art & Culture in the era of President John F. Kennedy



In this course, students will learn about the history of the years leading up to, during and just after the 3-year presidency of John F. Kennedy. In that historical context, they will examine and analyze the cultural arts scene during that period (roughly 1957-1968, or more broadly, the 1960’s). Some questions that will be addressed include the role of the President and the First Lady in promoting the arts in the U.S., how the rise of the media and cult of public image influenced the presidential endorsement of arts programs, and how artists themselves responded to the platform and programs put forth by JFK. Major issues of the time like the budding space program, the struggles of civil rights, the tensions of the Cold War, and the ideal of civic responsibility will be evaluated in the context of the visual, literary & performing arts. Students will read posted materials about the various topics of the course and respond to several assignments across the semester in a journal format. There will also be individual or small group presentations on topics of their choice.

Course #: FSP 161-59
Professor: Reinhard, Jayne
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 12:30 - 1:50PM
Reinhard, Jayne
FSP 161-47

Rebuilding the Human Body



Modern healthcare relies on the use of technology and medical devices. The definition, development and use of medical devices to “rebuild the human body” will be explored. Their interaction with the human body and its physiology in addition to the ethics, economics and myths of the bionic human will be discussed.

Course #: FSP 161-47
Professor: Hall, Constance
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11 - 12:20PM
Hall, Constance
FSP 161-21

Incarceraction Nation: Literature of the Prison



This course will explore the literature by and about prisoners from 600 AD to the present. Interdisciplinary in nature, this seminar will weave together the studies of gender, criminology, psychology, sociology, history and culture. We will read provocative, groundbreaking texts written by one of the most neglected, silenced, but all-too-critical sectors of our population—the incarcerated.

Course #: FSP 161-21
Professor: Tarter, Michelle
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 9:30 - 10:50AM
Tarter, Michelle
FSP 161-69

Nowhere to Hide



For the first time in history, our everyday activities are being observed by others. When we chat with a friend, shop for a new pair of shoes, acknowledge a post, drive our car, write a school paper, or share a meal with friends at a local restaurant, somebody is recording that activity. In this class, we will investigate the monitoring habits of businesses and governments and how these habits affect you and society. We will read books, watch movies, and listen to experts discuss issues around surveillance including those activities that may improve our lives and those that may hurt it. We will also explore practices business and government agencies can implement to protect our right to privacy and free us from constant surveillance without undermining advancements that could improve our lives.

Course #: FSP 161-69
Professor: Braender, Lynn
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2 - 3:20PM
Braender, Lynn
FSP 161-62

Hate literature: Antipathy and reconciliation in America



Reading the news in recent years, one often feels compelled to ask: Where does hatred come from? What are the origins of resentment and bigotry? And what should we do when we discover hate in others, or worse, in ourselves? This course will examine some literary depictions of spite, as a way of investigating its psychological, social, and economic sources. We will also consider whether it is desirable or possible to overcome interpersonal antipathies, and what role reading literature might play in that process. After studying the most notoriously hateful character in Western literature, Shakespeare's Iago, we will move forward in time to focus primarily on American literature and history.

Course #: FSP 161-62
Professor: Tuckman, Melissa
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2 - 3:20PM
Tuckman, Melissa
FSP 164-01

Rock N' Roll in Post Mao China



This course seeks to study the ‘Rock ‘n’ Roll’ music and culture (also including hip-hop and punk) that emerged in the Post-Mao Mainland China from the early 1980s to the present. By situating Chinese Rock (C-rock) in the dramatically changing historical, cultural and political context, the seminar examines critically how ‘Rock ‘n’ Roll’ music shapes the heterogeneous identity of Post-Mao and Post-socialist China. Through careful analysis of the lyrics, musical style, MTV and films, we explore topics such as rebellious youth culture and political ideology, influence of Western music and traditional Chinese music, underground subculture and urban space, transgressive passion and censorship, band culture, performance poetics and global capital, and, gender, sexuality and body identity. NOTE: Students are invited to also enroll in CHI 151, Intensive Chinese.

Course #: FSP 164-01
Professor: Mi, Jia-Yan
Day/s & Time/s: T: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Mi, Jia-YanGlobal
FSP 161-25

History Through Film and Literature



While the study of history requires that we know and accept many facts, it is also true that history is told through the stories of individuals with many points of views and experiences. In this class, we will explore history as seen through the eyes of writers and filmmakers to understand the exploration of "reality" and "truth." We will look at the 1960s, Vietnam, and Richard Nixon; the recent history of Afghanistan, and the tribal history of Africa through scholarly texts and myths.

Course #: FSP 161-25
Professor: Raskin, Donna
Day/s & Time/s: M: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Raskin, Donna
FSP 161-63

Hate literature: Antipathy and reconciliation in America



Reading the news in recent years, one often feels compelled to ask: Where does hatred come from? What are the origins of resentment and bigotry? And what should we do when we discover hate in others, or worse, in ourselves? This course will examine some literary depictions of spite, as a way of investigating its psychological, social, and economic sources. We will also consider whether it is desirable or possible to overcome interpersonal antipathies, and what role reading literature might play in that process. After studying the most notoriously hateful character in Western literature, Shakespeare's Iago, we will move forward in time to focus primarily on American literature and history.

Course #: FSP 161-63
Professor: Tuckman, Melissa
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 3:30 - 4:50PM
Tuckman, Melissa
FSP 161-46

Future of Work



"It is not enough to be busy; so are the ants. The question is: What are we busy about?" Henry David Thoreau. This question takes on intriguing possibilities in the age of robots. Robots are created to do something for humans — and do it faster and better than humans can. With the rapid advances in artificial intelligence and automation, robots can greatly reduce the need for human workers. Businesses and society will need to negotiate a new relationship between humans and robots — one in which they will work together rather than be perfect substitutes for one another! As the world advances, new jobs will be created. The job we’ll be doing 20 years from now may not even exist today. In this course, we will explore the future of work. How will individuals and organizations change the way they work in the coming years? And what does this mean for all of us?

Course #: FSP 161-46
Professor: Ahlawat, Sunity
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2 - 3:20PM
Ahlawat, Sunity
FSP 161-34

Sustainability, Society and Justice



Students will examine the various factors that impact the world’s ability to build a sustainable future that promotes equity and justice. Policies and practices on local, national, and global scales from the past to the present will be analyzed to help develop an understanding of how environmental issues disproportiantely impact some areas and groups of people. Students will evaluate various strategies for creating a more just and sustainable world. The format will include lecture, discussion, debate, small group work, local field trips, and student presentations.

Course #: FSP 161-34
Professor: Heddy, Eileen
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11 - 12:20PM
Heddy, Eileen
FSP 161-18

Star Wars: Films and Adaptations



“Star Wars: Films & Adaptations” examines the original movie trilogy (Episodes IV, V, VI) as well as the prequels (I, II, III), Star Wars: Episode VII - The Force Awakens, and Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. We also read one Star Wars novel, watch selected episodes of the Star Wars animated TV series (both Clone Wars series and Star Wars Rebels), and read about and discuss other ancillary creations (e.g. video games, collectibles, Jediism) that make up the Star Wars cultural phenomenon. Our approach is interdisciplinary: film studies, literature, philosophy, religious studies, history, sociology, anthropology, economics/marketing, other. The primary sources analyzed are the fictional works created by George Lucas and others; secondary sources include books and articles in a variety of disciplines. The final project is a research paper on a topic related to Star Wars. If you haven’t already watched all 8 films, please do so over the summer since we won’t be able to avoid spoilers in our reading and discussion.

Course #: FSP 161-18
Professor: Konkle, Lincoln
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2 - 3:20PM
Konkle, Lincoln
FSP 161-16

Planet Frankenstein: Reading Environment Globally



This course uses Mary Shelley’s 1818 novel Frankenstein as a template for exploring contemporary film and literature about the natural world and the current age of environmental crisis. The novel itself is a cautionary tale. On the one hand it warns about the dangers of human egotism and scientific myopia, while on the other it argues for the importance of social responsibility and an appreciation for the beauty and power of the natural world. Beyond Shelley's novel itself, we will explore these themes in literature relevant to multiple environmental issues around the world. Works include Potiki (New Zealand); Me, Who Dove into the Heart of the World (Mexico and the world’s oceans), and Animal’s People (India).

Course #: FSP 161-16
Professor: McCauley, Lawrence
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 - 1:50PM
McCauley, Lawrence
FSP 161-15

The History of Disease



The millennia and their impact on human society. These include smallpox, cholera, tuberculosis, bubonic plague, syphilis, and the Spanish flu of 1918. Among the emerging diseases we will explore are HIV/AIDS, ebola, SARS, and H1N1. How have we managed to eradicate smallpox and how close are we to ending the spread of polio? These and other questions will be answered in this course.“The history of disease will go on, despite once confident predictions of an end to epidemics in our times, and those who now wage the heroic struggle to find elusive cures to our new plagues may find that they have more to learn from the past than had once been thought.”

Course #: FSP 161-15
Professor: King, Rita Mary
Day/s & Time/s: MW: 7 - 8:20PM
King, Rita Mary
FSP 163-06

Communication and Gender



This course explores the relationship between gender and communication. It will explore attitudes and beliefs concerning female and male stereotypes as they are manifested through communication. This course will utilize various tools includes films, in-class exercises, class discussions in both large and small groups and field-study assignments.

Course #: FSP 163-06
Professor: Hallback, Dionne
Day/s & Time/s: T: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Hallback, DionneGender
FSP 162-02

Race, Crime and Prisons in U.S. History



This seminar draws on legal, social, cultural, and urban history, Whiteness, Multi-cultural/Ethnic, African American, Women and Gender, and LGBT Studies. In this course, students explore the convergent racial, gender, economic, and sexual ideologies and practices that animate criminal activity, prison reform, and penal administration from colonial times to the present. Students engage primary and secondary sources as ¿historians¿ critically analyzing the evolution of crime and punishment. Ultimately, students acquire knowledge of the mutually sustaining forces of crime and the prison system, and think critically and creatively about ways to address the social problems linked to both institutions.

Course #: FSP 162-02
Professor: Francis, Leigh-Anne
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 - 1:50PM
Francis, Leigh-AnneRace and Ethnicity
FSP 164-04

The $100 Startup



College is the time for students to figure out how they want to make a living by doing something they love. This course will provide students an opportunity to generate ideas for potential business opportunities. Through readings, videos, brainstorming, case analysis, community engaged learning, presentations, and research, we will cover issues related to startup and entrepreneurship at global level.

Course #: FSP 164-04
Professor: Tang, Lynn
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11 - 12:20PM
Tang, LynnGlobal
FSP 161-56

Deadly Poison or Saving Grace? - The History and Science of Modern Insecticides



This course is a comprehensive examination of the history and role of modern insecticides from a scientific perspective. Modern insecticides have had a global impact on society and environment– from eradicating human disease, protecting our forests, and to enhancing the quality of our agriculture. At the same time, insecticides have been linked to ecological turmoil, pollution, and numerous secondary health issues. During this course, we will examine the evolution of insecticide use in our society. By learning the history and science of insecticides, students will develop a better understanding of how to assess the benefits and risks of this important group of agents.

Course #: FSP 161-56
Professor: Sen, Stephanie
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11 - 12:20PM
Sen, Stephanie
FSP 161-60

The Seduction of Horror & Human Behavior



For some people there is a distinct sensation that occurs when entranced by a favorite Horror movie, one that is riddled with questions such as, “What would I do in that situation?”, “How would I react differently and would that make me less human?” or “Why does this scare me?” This course will examine modern Horror texts, secondary essays, and visual media in order to explore philosophies of the genre while analyzing human behavior in various, and disturbing, situations. Some of the primary texts include Stephen King's "The Shining", Max Brooks' "World War Z", Robert Kirkman's "The Walking Dead" graphic novels, and Noel Carroll’s "The Philosophy of Horror". While examining these texts, we will focus on such overarching questions as “Do reactionary decisions define what it is to be human?” and “What is the relationship between human identity, psychological reaction, and circumstantial influences?”

Course #: FSP 161-60
Professor: Dittmer, Nicole
Day/s & Time/s: MW: 5:30 - 6:50PM
Dittmer, Nicole
FSP 161-01

The Mass Appeal of YA Fiction



Young-adult (YA) fiction is literature for adolescent and teenage readers featuring teenage characters. However, in recent years YA fiction has become increasingly popular for readers of all ages, including adults. YA fiction has become mass-produced and highly popular, some of the more trendy novels being turned into star-studded feature films. By reading three YA novels as a class, this course will look at the themes present in YA fiction and examine why these books have such mass, widespread appeal outside of its target audience. We will look at the importance of this trend in the literary world, pop culture, and society as a whole.

Course #: FSP 161-01
Professor: Anthes, Madeline
Day/s & Time/s: T: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Anthes, Madeline
FSP 161-42

Shakespeare and Film



This course will focus on the history of the treatment and adaptation of selected Shakespeare plays on film. We will read a select body of plays which have received multiple treatments, in film, video and “new media” formats, over the past 100 years and consider the differences between their presentation on the page, the stage, and the screen.

Course #: FSP 161-42
Professor: Connolly, Maureen
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2 - 3:20PM
Connolly, Maureen
FSP 161-70

Language, Languages, and Society



In this course, we study what makes human language different from the communication systems used by other species and look at the systems that all languages use to build meaning. Then we take up the question of how we use language in social contexts among friends, family, classmates, colleagues, supervisors, strangers, as well as with health care professionals. We consider what makes an accent an accent, that associations and impressions accents generate, and look at language-based bias and stereotyping. We also study how babies acquire the language of their parents, the nature of bilingualism, and how adults learn a second or foreign language. The course examines the relationship of language and ethnicity by analyzing particular languistic situations in depth. As part of this course, students engage in ESL tutoring in Trenton to fulfill the CEL requirement.

Course #: FSP 161-70
Professor: Stillman, David
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 - 1:50PM
Stillman, David
FSP 161-61

The Seduction of Horror & Human Behavior



For some people there is a distinct sensation that occurs when entranced by a favorite Horror movie, one that is riddled with questions such as, “What would I do in that situation?”, “How would I react differently and would that make me less human?” or “Why does this scare me?” This course will examine modern Horror texts, secondary essays, and visual media in order to explore philosophies of the genre while analyzing human behavior in various, and disturbing, situations. Some of the primary texts include Stephen King's "The Shining", Max Brooks' "World War Z", Robert Kirkman's "The Walking Dead" graphic novels, and Noel Carroll’s "The Philosophy of Horror". While examining these texts, we will focus on such overarching questions as “Do reactionary decisions define what it is to be human?” and “What is the relationship between human identity, psychological reaction, and circumstantial influences?”

Course #: FSP 161-61
Professor: Dittmer, Nicole
Day/s & Time/s: MW: 7 - 8:20PM
Dittmer, Nicole
FSP 161-26

History Through Film and Literature



While the study of history requires that we know and accept many facts, it is also true that history is told through the stories of individuals with many points of views and experiences. In this class, we will explore history as seen through the eyes of writers and filmmakers to understand the exploration of "reality" and "truth." We will look at the 1960s, Vietnam, and Richard Nixon; the recent history of Afghanistan, and the tribal history of Africa through scholarly texts and myths.

Course #: FSP 161-26
Professor: Raskin, Donna
Day/s & Time/s: R: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Raskin, Donna
FSP 161-57

Horror in the Novel



In this course we will read and discuss a variety of horror novels by writers such as Henry James, Stephen King, Joe Hill, V. C. Andrews, and Shirley Jackson. We will focus in particular on the different roles of women and men in these novels in relation to the home, the family, and to the larger social world. We will also be asking whether women or men are more often the agents of horror, how power is allocated according to gender, and what kind of resolution, if any, is available to those who experience the terror and trauma described in the fiction. We will explore the nature of horror itself in terms of how it arises and whom it affects, paying particular attention to the representations of class, gender, and sexuality.

Course #: FSP 161-57
Professor: Kranzler, Laura
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2 - 3:20PM
Kranzler, Laura
FSP 162-07

What Does it Mean to Be American?



This class will probe historical and contemporary debates about what it means to be an American citizen from the perspectives of law, politics, and culture. We review the concept of citizenship as it was adopted by the founders of the United States from the Greeks, and as it evolved through debates over the Constitution, and other relevant laws and court cases. We will examine the ways in which race, ethnicity, gender, religion, national origin, class and slave or free status have served as ways of defining or limiting citizenship rights. We will also review contemporary debates over immigration, terrorism and mass incarceration affect our understanding of the rights and responsibilities of citizens.

Course #: FSP 162-07
Professor: Pearson, Kim
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2 - 3:20PM
Pearson, KimRace and Ethnicity
FSP 161-10

Prosperity and Rational Optimism



For nearly all of human history, global poverty was the norm. Living standards began to improve only about 200 years ago. Since then, they’ve rocketed upward in many places around the world. What factors are responsible for beginning this unprecedented march of human progress? In this course, we’ll explore the causes of modern prosperity and rational reasons to be optimistic about the future. The goal is to counter political, media, and academic biases toward pessimism that can lead people to take human progress for granted, to fabricate or exaggerate problems, and to propose solutions that threaten to kill the goose that lays the golden eggs. Sustaining a widely shared prosperity requires informed vigilance to preserve rather than erode the foundations of this remarkable historical anomaly.

Course #: FSP 161-10
Professor:Ruscio, John
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11 - 12:20PM
Ruscio, John
FSP 161-55

It’s Going to Get a Lot Worse: Science vs. Society in the Post-genomic Era



The course content has been selected to reframe classical genetics in light of recent discoveries and modern molecular tools that have revolutionized our understanding of biology. In class, work will focus on learning the technical aspects that surround hot-button topics such as assisted reproductive technology, genetics of complex diseases and psychological disorders, next-generation sequencing, therapeutic cloning, stem cells, sequencing of the human genome, among others. The writing assignments will allow students to intensely explore the technical, social, legal, financial, and ethical issues of that have been created by unparalleled access to biological data.  This course will begin with the basics of genetic analysis and no prior knowledge of any discipline is assumed.

Course #: FSP 161-55
Professor: Nayak, Sudhir
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 - 10:50AM
Nayak, Sudhir
FSP 161-48

Are We What We Eat? Food, Culture and Identity



In 1825, French attorney, politician and gastronome Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin wrote, "Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are." In this course, we will consider the connection between what we eat and who we are as we explore themes of gastronomy. We will examine how our food and eating choices have shaped and preserved individual and cultural identities throughout history. We will investigate the power and meaning of food using historical, social-anthropological, and political lenses. Through critical reading of academic and popular literature, thoughtful viewing of visual materials, classroom discussion, and community engaged learning, we will study the relationship between the food we eat and our sense of individual and cultural identity and take a broad look at how food shapes us and our culture.

Course #: FSP 161-48
Professor: Roe, Lisa
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 - 10:50AM
Roe, Lisa
FSP 161-51

Human Abilities Unplugged



“Disability is not a 'brave struggle’ or 'courage in the face of adversity’ . . . disability is an art. It’s an ingenious way to live.” – Neil Marcus – This quote by Neil Marcus reflects the central focus of this seminar regarding the study of human ability and the struggle among people perceived as more different than alike. Mr. Marcus is a poet, humorist, writer, actor and a self proclaimed adventurer who is creatively endowed with disability. His disability denies his ability to speak, stand, walk and/or control sudden and bizarre movements. The study of disability as a key aspect of human experience equal with race, class, gender, sex, and sexual orientation is explored through an alternate post modern paradigm that views difference from a variety of angles. The course commences and terminates with an attempt to define “Human-ness” or the parameters of what makes us “human.” This is compared to the human variability that we experience in our societies, communities and civilizations. This study of ability has important political, social, and economic import for society as a whole, including both disabled and non-disabled people.

Course #: FSP 161-51
Professor: Schuler, Amy
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 - 10:50AM
Schuler, Amy K
FSP 161-27

Apocalypse Now



The media is saturated with cries of the apocalypse with news outlets regularly covering religious and astrological doomsday prophets. Survivalists have television shows teaching their skills and zombie movies are frequent box office hits. Our culture both fears and craves the end days. What does this say about humanity and its innate settings? To what extent does fear of the apocalypse mirror uncertainties of our own times? Does this fear represent humanity at its worst, or can it be indicative of the great reaches we can accomplish? This course will explore those questions, and will use fiction, film, and a number of articles as prompts to write about issues such as hope, fear, religion, and perseverance.

Course #: FSP 161-27
Professor: Schmidt, Randy
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11 - 12:20PM
Schmidt, Randy
FSP 161-52

Music and the Natural World



This course introduces elementary topics and tools of music, philosophy, anthropology, physics, biology and other fields to examine aspects of the relationship between the natural world and the music of human society. Beginning with a discussion of the possible origins and purposes of music, we trace the thread of environmental influence in musical styles. Historical and current examples from Western Classical music are considered, including sound installations, as well as non-Western traditions, folk styles and commercial music. We end with observations of nature in virtual performances and environments of the digital age and speculation of nature's continued role in the future evolution of the musical experience.

Course #: FSP 161-52
Professor: Wilkinson, Carlton
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Wilkinson, Carlton
FSP 163-05

LGBTQ and Popular Culture



This course will explore LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer) identity, culture, and politics by way of their representations in documentaries and popular films. I often share with students that there are at least three major reasons for why there's been a significant shift globally in pro LGBT civil and human rights. First, many anti-gay laws are being repealed (e.g. anti-gay marriage laws and DADT). Second, many people now personally know friends, family members, and co-workers who are LGBT, thus personalizing the issue. Third_and related to the course theme_there's been an outpouring of LGBT popular culture, thus helping to globalize many LGBT concerns, issues, and topics to a wide variety of people and places. This course will explore the stories about LGBT identity, culture, and politics that are being told in popular culture_especially in light of the work they do in contributing to a global transformation on the issue of LGBT_by focusing on a number of themes/topics relevant to contemporary LGBT life: LGBT activism; marriage equality; LGBT and public schooling; LGBT and religion; transgender/genderqueer identity; intimacy and erotic life; the politics of reparative therapy; and the coming out process.

Course #: FSP 163-05
Professor: Rodriguez, Nelson
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 3:30 - 4:50PM
Rodriguez, NelsonGender
FSP 161-54

Cancer: The Emperor of all Maladies



Cancer is fundamentally a genetic disease. This is because it results from the accumulation of many mistakes in our genes, which then code for the production of faulty proteins, which then make our own cells misbehave. Therefore, in this course we will begin by exploring the fascinating cell and molecular biology of normal cells that informs our understanding of cancer cells. With that background we will then follow the history of the disease through the eyes of scientists, physicians, and patients. From these investigations two ideas should emerge: first, that cancer is an extremely complex disease that poses tremendous challenges to those trying to treat it, but second, that truly remarkable strides have been made in fighting cancer as a result of the combined efforts of tenacious scientists and physicians, and incredibly courageous patients.

Course #: FSP 161-54
Professor: O'Connell, Marcia
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11 - 12:20PM
O’Connell, Marcia
FSP 161-19

The Digital Domain



Is there any aspect of our lives that the Internet and/or digital technology has NOT affected? From how we connect through text messaging and social media to how we listen to music, study, date, vote, acquire the news and shop, our online and digital interactions are profoundly shaping our daily existence. In this course, we examine the possibilities and the problems that technology poses. We will also study those who do not have access to the technology that has become ubiquitous in our lives. We will fulfill the college’s Community Engaged Learning (CEL) requirement through a project that we create in collaboration with the Bonner Institute for Civic and Learning Engagement.

Course #: FSP 161-19
Professor: Mazur, Janet
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11 - 12:20PM
Mazur, Janet
FSP 161-58

Horror in the Novel



In this course we will read and discuss a variety of horror novels by writers such as Henry James, Stephen King, Joe Hill, V. C. Andrews, and Shirley Jackson. We will focus in particular on the different roles of women and men in these novels in relation to the home, the family, and to the larger social world. We will also be asking whether women or men are more often the agents of horror, how power is allocated according to gender, and what kind of resolution, if any, is available to those who experience the terror and trauma described in the fiction. We will explore the nature of horror itself in terms of how it arises and whom it affects, paying particular attention to the representations of class, gender, and sexuality.

Course #: FSP 161-58
Professor: Kranzler, Laura
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 3:30 - 4:50PM
Kranzler, Laura
FSP 162-12

Race, Crime and Prisons in U.S. History



This seminar draws on legal, social, cultural, and urban history, Whiteness, Multi-cultural/Ethnic, African American, Women and Gender, and LGBT Studies. In this course, students explore the convergent racial, gender, economic, and sexual ideologies and practices that animate criminal activity, prison reform, and penal administration from colonial times to the present. Students engage primary and secondary sources as ¿historians¿ critically analyzing the evolution of crime and punishment. Ultimately, students acquire knowledge of the mutually sustaining forces of crime and the prison system, and think critically and creatively about ways to address the social problems linked to both institutions.

Course #: FSP 162-12
Professor: Francis, Leigh-Anne
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11 - 12:20PM
Francis, Leigh-AnneRace and Ethnicity
FSP 164-03

The Impact of Globalization



With the advancement of new technology, communications between people have been greatly enhanced. However, the initiatives and the practices of globalization, such as the results of exporting free market democracy, have created a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural, and political changes in the world. This seminar addresses many relevant issues with respect to changes, conflicts, doubts, problems, and possible solutions. Students have a chance to read many resources as well as to watch many films to explore issues seriously, including the continuing struggle for development in poor countries; the relationship between globalization, inequality and poverty; the fate of cultural diversity in a globalizing world; and issues of gender, ethnicity, the environment, social justice, and human rights.

Course #: FSP 164-03
Professor: Pan, Alex
Day/s & Time/s: R: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Pan, AlexGlobal
FSP 161-07

Social Justice in the Past and Present



The question that Cain asks of God in the Book of Genesis, 'Am I my brother's keeper?' epitomizes the powerful role of religion in shaping both ancient and modern ideas of social justice. By what principles, religious or secular, is the just society to be envisaged? What does it mean to say that humans have rights? How are ethical values and ideas of social justice linked to religious belief and secular philosophical concepts? This seminar compares ancient and medieval views on such issues with those of the modern world. Discussions will focus on a selection of pre-modern and modern writings representative of different world cultures, some modern films, and news reports on current events.

Course #: FSP 161-07
Professor: Chazelle, Celia
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2 - 3:20PM
Chazelle, Celia
FSP 164-02

The Impact of Globalization



With the advancement of new technology, communications between people have been greatly enhanced. However, the initiatives and the practices of globalization, such as the results of exporting free market democracy, have created a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural, and political changes in the world. This seminar addresses many relevant issues with respect to changes, conflicts, doubts, problems, and possible solutions. Students have a chance to read many resources as well as to watch many films to explore issues seriously, including the continuing struggle for development in poor countries; the relationship between globalization, inequality and poverty; the fate of cultural diversity in a globalizing world; and issues of gender, ethnicity, the environment, social justice, and human rights.

Course #: FSP 164-02
Professor: Pan, Alex
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Pan, AlexGlobal
FSP 164-07

REFUGEE CRISIS: Movement, Identity, People and Politics



This course helps students not only think more deeply about their own cultural identity, but helps them build a framework for understanding one of the most pressing issues of our time, how to manage the greater than 60 million refugees across the world. We will examine the issue from an academic and personal perspective interacting with the local community in Ewing and beyond as we review myriad of sources from poems, to news articles, to journal articles, to works of art. The course will help students understand the complexity of the political and social environment shapes policies which impact refugees, as well as everyday challenges refugees face on their journey and in their assimilation processes. We will examine the crisis from various regional perspectives, including the Middle East, Africa and Central America. The seminar format takes advantage of a variety of teaching and learning methods to develop not just content knowledge, but builds skills in critical thinking, creativity, writing, and independence. 

Course #: FSP 164-07
Professor: Becker, Karen
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 1:30 - 3:20PM
Becker, KarenGlobal
FSP 161-05

The Art and Study of Peer Mentorship



"Few things help an individual more than to place responsibility upon him and to let him know you trust him” -- Booker T. Washington. Trust and responsibility are two important skills when developing a positive mentor/mentee relationship. This course will examine and promote skill development in the current evidence-based practices that are reflected in the provision of mentorship among peers with an emphasis on youth (ages 18-25). This course will also focus on developing one’s own interpersonal behavior skills including active listening, verbal/non-verbal communication, building trust, self-management, etc. Students will be instructed in both the theory and practice of providing mentorship to peers that are at-risk. Practice in skill development will be implemented through a field component that provides support to students with intellectual / developmental disabilities.

Course #: FSP 161-05
Professor: Bonfanti, Bryana
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30-8:20PM
Bonfanti, Bryana
FSP 162-10

The Evolution of African American Gospel Music



This course traces Black Gospel Music from its origins to its present day varied arrangements. Lectures will include information presented on Black Gospel Music Icons; the various instruments and styles of musical arrangements and more to present the richness and value of this cultural expression. Students come prepared to sing a little (as a group only) and attend at least two worship experiences (i.e., Sunday morning worship and/or a Gospel concert). Furthermore, our class participates with the Bonner Center and completes a community-engaged project that is course-related.

Course #: FSP 162-10
Professor: McCrary, Todd
Day/s & Time/s: R: 5:30 - 8:20PM
McCrary, ToddRace and Ethnicity
FSP 161-43

Mathematical miscarriages of justice: on the use and abuse of analytical arguments in the courtroom



In this class we will analyze the use of basic mathematical and statistical arguments found in real courtroom cases. Taking a critical eye to several case studies, we will work together to understand how analytical arguments are used effectively on the stand, how they are often used erroneously, and what the consequences of its use in court can be for justice in the world. Some of the cases we will study are famous. Many have dire consequences for the parties involved. All of them hinge on the use or misuse of mathematics.

Course #: FSP 161-42
Professor: Marcus, Steffen
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Marcus, Steffen
FSP 161-31

The Ethics and Sustainability of the Global Fashion Industry



Who makes our clothes, how they are made and what impact their production has on our world are all ethical questions related to the 3 trillion-dollar a year global fashion industry. When the production of clothing and textiles was moved in the nineties from the United States to countries where cheaper labor could be found, the cost of clothing to the consumer began to decrease while the human and environmental costs increased dramatically. In this course, we examine how consumer spending on cheap, fast fashion has come at a high cost to people and planet and what can be done to create a more sustainable future for the global fashion industry.

Course #: FSP 161-31
Professor: Webber, Kathleen
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11 - 12:20PM
Webber, Kathleen
FSP 164-06

Global Representation of Healthcare and Professions in Media: 1950-Present



This freshman seminar will explore how the healthcare system and its professionals are represented from both a global and historical perspective. Non-fiction and fiction literature, news media, movies, television shows and videogames, from 1950 though the present, are explored to both describe how health and healthcare providers are imagined in these media sources as well as to compare those representations across time and culture. Emphasis is placed on critical analysis of media in both classroom discussion and in written essays and papers.

Course #: FSP 164-06
Professor's: Kartoz, Connie and Byrne, Sharon
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 - 1:50PM
Kartoz, Connie R., & Byrne, SharonGlobal
FSP 161-24

Leaders Are Made, Not Born: Leadership Development at TCNJ



Students who take part in this class will learn how to gain leadership skills, explore leadership styles and learn how to actively engage on campus Students will gain a better understanding of their own leadership potential through leadership assessments, exploration of values, and skill development. This interactive class will be looking at leadership through a variety of stories, readings, videos, and activities. At the end of the course, we hope that you have gained the skills to become a better student leader and to actively engage in and impact the College community.

Course #: FSP 161-24
Professor: Rana, Avani
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 - 10:50AM
Rana, Avani
FSP 161-02

The Pursuit of Happiness



Students will explore the concept of happiness from a philosophical, psychological, religious, political, economic and physiological perspective. Readings will include classical writings from Aristotle as well as recent texts on the subject such as, What happy people know. Students will examine societal notions of happiness, like the Gross National Happiness Index in Bhutan, and research studies conducted in Denmark, the "happiest country in the world." Finally, students will participate in varied 'happiness' practices such as meditation and service, and develop their own pursuit of happiness plan of action.

Course #: FSP 161-02
Professor: Anthony, Helene
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2 - 3:20PM
Anthony, Helene
FSP 161-66

Shakespeare and Power



Ralph Waldo Emerson once said of Shakespeare: “He wrote the text of modern life.” Or as the contemporary scholar Harold Bloom has declared: “Shakespeare invented us.” Although those claims are surely debatable, it’s true that the popularity of Shakespeare’s drama and poetry has endured for more than 400 years. A strong part of that appeal, at least since the Earl of Essex staged Richard II on the eve of his failed rebellion against Queen Elizabeth in 1601, has been the way Shakespeare’s drama represents and engages political power. Philosophers, political theorists, and even politicians have long turned to the insights of Shakespeare’s Richard II to understand divine monarchy, to Richard III to theorize tyranny, or to Macbeth to scrutinize personal ambition. Perhaps now more than ever art and popular culture is attempting to ‘speak truth to power’ through subtle—or brazen—critiques, and Shakespeare’s works, characters, and insights continue to be re-contextualized and redeployed. In this course we’ll explore how three of Shakespeare’s plays interact with power and use that interaction as our own occasion for extensive rhetorical practice.

Course #: FSP 161-66
Professor: Ritger, Matthew
Day/s & Time/s: M: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Ritger, Matthew
FSP 164-09

Imprisoned Minds: Philosophy & Religion from Jail



In the history of philosophy and theology, many important works have been written by authors who were behind bars. This course introduces students to a selection of these texts and the concerns they raise. Such texts deal not only with classical problems in the history of philosophy, but also with concerns that many of us share today. Questions to be addressed include: “What does it mean to live in freedom?”, “What can be done about injustice and oppression?”, “Should death be feared?”, and “Where can I find happiness?” Readings include works by Plato, Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., & Aung San Suu Kyi.

Course #: FSP 164-09
Professor: Edwards, Mark
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 - 1:50PM
Edwards, MarkGlobal
FSP 161-35

Sustainability, Society and Justice



Students will examine the various factors that impact the world’s ability to build a sustainable future that promotes equity and justice. Policies and practices on local, national, and global scales from the past to the present will be analyzed to help develop an understanding of how environmental issues disproportiantely impact some areas and groups of people. Students will evaluate various strategies for creating a more just and sustainable world. The format will include lecture, discussion, debate, small group work, local field trips, and student presentations.

Course #: FSP 161-35
Professor: Heddy, Eileen
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2 - 3:20PM
Heddy, Eileen
FSP 161-23

The Necessity of Theater



Is theatre still necessary in the age of new media? Do we need theatre and performance to help provide an understanding of the world in which we live and the life that we inhabit? In this seminar, we will explore these questions (with a little help from Plato and Aristotle) before reading and viewing several classic and contemporary plays and musicals, each characterizing a different dramatic viewpoint or style of theatrical representation. In addition to class discussion of the plays and relevant readings, students will participate in a field trip to attend a professional production and meet with its production team, write two analytical essays, participate in a formal online discussion, and complete several brief writing exercises that explore the nature of academic writing. (This is a theatre appreciation course, not a performance-based or acting course; no prior knowledge of theatre is required or expected).

Course #: FSP 161-23
Professor: Muller, David
Day/s & Time/s: TR: 7 - 8:20PM
Muller, David G.
FSP 161-44

Ability and Disability: Deconstructing the Social and Cultural Gaze-Course



Disability is ubiquitous and permeates literary narratives, medical narratives, films, television, common discourse and other spaces. Disability tends to be subjected to our "gaze" in some way or the other and continually captures our curiosity. Interestingly while it evokes fascination, it also disrupts closely held notions of health, normalcy, ability and the body. This disruption is typically dealt with by finding a way to "reign" in the difference, situate it in a specific space, or identify a rational explanation. Paradoxically, although disability is visible everywhere and evokes our curiosity, it is rendered invisible in other ways. This course is about the social and cultural gaze directed towards disability and what that tells us about our assumptions on binaries such as ability/disability, our notions of body and movement as well as our perceptions of normalcy. The course introduces students to the field of Disability Studies and encourages them to critically examine their gaze and challenge and deconstruct the taken for granted assumptions about disability. The course focuses on how disability is presented in literary narratives, films, as well as other forms of discourse. Issues of agency and citizenship are examined through personal narratives and the accounts of people with disabilities on the web and blogosphere. Embracing an interdisciplinary approach, the course traces the origins of disability studies in the UK and the US and the intersectional conversations with critical studies, feminist disability studies, post colonial disability studies and disability studies in education.

Course #: FSP 161-44
Professor: Rao, Shri
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2 - 3:20PM
Rao, Shri
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