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2018 FSP Courses

The First Seminar (or FSP for short) is a small seminar-style class that all entering first-year students take during their first semester at TCNJ. The course enables entering students to work closely with a professor and their fellow students on a topic of their choosing outside of their major. It offers students an opportunity to engage in an intellectually exciting and challenging experience at the beginning of their college career.

Instructions

  1. Students in the Honors, Bonner, or W.I.L.L. program should go to the  “Honors” or “Bonner/W.I.L.L.” page for their program and follow the directions there; do not follow the directions below.
  2. Some departments and schools give specific advice on how to choose your FSP course.  Please check the “Major Specific FSP Info” page before picking your FSP.
  3. From the list of FSP courses, please pick six sections that interest you.
  4. Once you have chosen six FSP sections, please put them in your First Semester Worksheet.
  5. Your FSPs choices will not be ranked when entered into the First Semester Worksheet. One of your choices will be assigned to you as your FSP.

ClassName/DescriptionInstructorCivic Responsibility
FSP 161-36

The Bible: America's Best Selling Book



It is consistently America's best selling book: the Bible. No book has more profoundly shaped American history, and no book is held in wider esteem by Americans, generation after generation. But what's inside this hallowed volume? One will find compelling narratives, stirring words, ghastly events, and tawdry encounters, which have seeded 1000s of faith traditions and nurtured billions of believers. This seminar will sample each of the Bible's genres, critically examine the contexts and uses of select texts, and trace out their influence on American history, literature, politics, and religion.

Course #: FSP 161-16
Professor: Clydesdale, Tim
Day/s & Time/s: TR: 8:30 - 9:50PM
Clydesdale, Tim
FSP 164-19

Morality of Markets



Should we buy and sell sex, kidneys, human eggs and sperm, or votes? Should women be allowed to rent out their wombs to infertile couples, or prisoners be allowed to pay for "upgraded" prison cells? Should we condemn or condone the use of sweatshop labor? Should businesses be allowed to discriminate based on race, or gender, or sexual orientation? Should there be any moral limits to markets--or should everything be for sale? This class will address all of these issues, and more.

Course #: FSP 164-19
Professor: Taylor, James
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11 - 12:20PM
Taylor, JamesGlobal
FSP 163-05

EmpowHer: Women, Communication, & Leadership



EmpowHer: Women, Communication, and Leadership will expose students to relevant leadership theories and models while attending to the gendered aspects of leadership and empowerment. By situating communication at the center of these discussions, students will examine how interpersonal communication has the potential to enhance their ability to influence, support, and lead others during times of transition, crisis, or growth. Specifically, students will explore challenges women uniquely face in both personal and professional roles and how interpersonal communication can be a strategic tool for managing and growing through them.

Course #: FSP 163-05
Professor: Fazio, Keli
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2 - 3:20PM
Fazio, KeliGender
FSP 162-03

Multicultural New York: The City from its Beginnings to the Present



Is New York really the capital of the world? How did it become such a great multicultural city? What does it mean to be a New Yorker? These are some of the essential questions that will guide us as we study the events that shaped New York’s multicultural history from its beginnings to the present. As we explore different periods of the city's history some of the areas we will focus on are immigration, changing neighborhoods, crime, technology, quality of life, money, power, culture and art. Our course time will be divided between lectures/presentations, in-class discussion, and real world experiences.

Course #: FSP 162-03
Professor: Winkel, Matthew
Day/s & Time/s: T: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Winkel, MatthewRace & Ethnicity
FSP 163-01

Communication and Gender



This course explores the relationship between gender and communication. It will explore attitudes and beliefs concerning female and male stereotypes as they are manifested through communication. This course will utilize various tools includes films, in-class exercises, class discussions in both large and small groups and field-study assignments.

Course #: FSP 163-01
Professor: Hallback, Dionne L.
Day/s & Time/s: T: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Hallback, Dionne L.Gender
FSP 161-44

Corrupting the Youth



The Ancient Greek philosopher Socrates was accused, tried, imprisoned, and executed because he was thought to be such a threat to Athenian society. One of the charges was that of corrupting the youth. For those in power in the Athenian State this meant that Socrates taught young persons to think logically, to think for themselves, to be critical of what others tried to get them to believe, and to be critical about their own thinking-and they executed him to stop him. / In this course we will do like Socrates, and examine some foundational problems and issues in philosophy in order to acquire a skill/superpower that makes people nervous. We will start with basic concepts concerning the mind, knowledge and reality; and basic concepts of logic, logical analysis, validity and soundness. Then we will move on to the examination of the nature of knowledge and the problem of skepticism; the nature of knowledge and the problem of our knowledge of other minds; the nature of mind and the mind-body problem; and, finally, the nature of morality and the problem of moral criteria. I can't promise that anybody will get arrested or executed, but you never know. / / There are no prerequisites for this course. /

Course #: FSP 161-44
Professor: Preti, Consuelo
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30pm-1:50pm
Preti, Consuelo
FSP 161-46

Incarceration Nation: The Literature of the Prison



This course will explore the literature by and about prisoners from 600 AD to the present. Interdisciplinary in nature, this seminar will weave together the studies of gender, criminology, psychology, sociology, history and culture. We will read provocative, groundbreaking texts written by one of the most neglected, silenced, but all-too-critical sectors of our population—the incarcerated.

Course #: FSP 161-46
Professor: Tarter, Michele
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11:00am-12:20pm
Tarter, Michele
FSP 164-21

The Impact of Globalization



With the advancement of new technology, communications between people have been greatly enhanced. However, the initiatives and the practices of globalization, such as the results of exporting free market democracy, have created a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural, and political changes in the world. This seminar addresses many relevant issues with respect to changes, conflicts, doubts, problems, and possible solutions. Students have a chance to read many resources as well as to watch many films to explore issues seriously, including the continuing struggle for development in poor countries; the relationship between globalization, inequality and poverty; the fate of cultural diversity in a globalizing world; and issues of gender, ethnicity, the environment, social justice, and human rights.

Course #: FSP 164-21
Professor: Pan, Alex
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Pan, Alex Global
FSP 161-19

“I want my MTV! Representations and Memories of the 1980s”



This course examines contemporary representations of the moments and icons that defined the 1980s: MTV, Ronald Reagan, “The Breakfast Club,” white youths wanting to “be like Mike” (African-American basketball star Michael Jordan), AIDS, etc. It seeks to not only to appreciate how people of the 1980s saw themselves and their world, but also to grasp the means in which our present-day memories and perceptions of those events are different. We will first examine theories on memory, how people remember (and forget!), the importance of age and social context, and the ways in which the needs of the present alter our conception of the past. From there, we examine cultural representations of the 1980s, such as film, music, fashion, sports, literature, etc., which will serve as a window into that time. The heart of the course will be applying the theories of memory we learned to better understand the meanings contemporaries of the 1980s imputed into movies such as “Back to the Future” and how a song like “Born in the USA” was so often misinterpreted. By the end of the course, you will have both an appreciation of your parents’ generation and the intellectual tools to grasp how the nostalgia of the 1980s is shaped by people trying to make sense of the world in which they lived and live.

Course #: FSP 161-19
Professor: :Campo, Joseph
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11:00am-12:20pm
Campo, Joseph
FSP 164-03

History Through Film and Literature



In this class we will explore history through story and image. Specifically, we will look at the ethnic groups of Africa and Africa today. Then, we will explore the 1960s and 1970s, learning about Richard Nixon, hippies, and the Vietnam War. Finally, we will try to understand Afghanistan and the United States' involvement with that country in the 1980s through today. We will read Half of a Yellow Sun and watch Long Way Down and Blood Diamond; Frost/Nixon, and Charlie Wilson's War and Osama, among other novels and films.

Course #: FSP 164-03
Professor: Raskin, Donna
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2 - 3:20PM
Raskin, DonnaGlobal
FSP 161-06

The Digital Domain



Is there any aspect of our lives that the Internet and/or digital technology has NOT affected? From how we connect through text messaging and social media to how we listen to music, study, date, vote, acquire the news and shop, our online and digital interactions are profoundly shaping our daily existence. In this course, we examine the possibilities and the problems that technology poses. We will also study those who do not have access to the technology that has become ubiquitous in our lives. We will fulfill the college’s Community Engaged Learning (CEL) requirement through a project that we create in collaboration with the Bonner Institute for Civic and Learning Engagement.

Course #: FSP 161-06
Professor: Mazur, Janet
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11:00am-12:20pm
Mazur, Janet
FSP 161-40

Walking in the Anthropocene



Charles Dickens writes that “The Sum of the whole is this: walk and be happy; walk and be healthy.” Is it really that simple? Has walking changed? Or have changes in our world altered our experiences with walking? So many great writers of the past—Wordsworth, Thoreau, Dickens—were avid walkers and hikers, but how is walking different for those of us living in times of environmental degradation. We will read fiction, poetry, and essays related to walking in the anthropocene--that period of time marked by the significant impact of humans on ecosystems. Focused on how creative writers respond to climate change, population density, and other signs of humanity’s reshaping of the Earth, this course will consider the art (as well as the need, frustrations, and challenges) of walking in the anthropocene.

Course #: FSP 161-40
Professor: Bennett, Charles
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2:00pm-3:20pm
Bennett, Charles
FSP 161-32

Elements of Journalism



Students from the TCNJ campus and its surrounding communities will explore the foundational principles of journalism as well as the challenges and opportunities confronting news organizations covering Trenton and Mercer County. In collaborative teams, we will create news and editorial products that reflect the principles articulated in the seminal work, The Elements of Journalism: What Newspeople Should Know and The Public Should Expect, along with critiques and suggestions of ways to build a culturally responsive news ecosystem that fosters broad community engagement and cooperative problem-solving.

Course #: FSP 161-32
Professor: Pearson, Kim
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2:30pm-3:20pm
Pearson, Kim
FSP 164-04

The Stories Behind Our Food



Almost two hundred years ago, French attorney, politician and gastronome Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin wrote, "Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are." In this course, we will consider the connections both past and present between what we eat and who we are and examine how our food and eating choices have shaped and preserved individual and cultural identities throughout history. We will investigate the power and meaning of food using historical, sociological, social-anthropological, and political lenses. We will explore where our food comes from, what makes “good” food good (e.g., healthy, ethical, culturally authentic, tasty, etc.), and consider issues of food justice and food ethics. Through critical reading of academic and popular literature, thoughtful viewing of visual materials, classroom discussion, and community engaged learning, we will take a broad look at the stories of our food.

Course #: FSP 164-04
Professor: Roe, Lisa
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 - 10:50AM
Roe, LisaGlobal
FSP 162-05

The Evolution of African American Gospel Music



This course traces Black Gospel Music from its origins to its present day varied arrangements. Lectures will include information presented on Black Gospel Music Icons; the various instruments and styles of musical arrangements and more to present the richness and value of this cultural expression. Students come prepared to sing a little (as a group only) and attend at least two worship experiences (i.e., Sunday morning worship and/or a Gospel concert).

Course #: FSP 162-05
Professor: McCrary, Todd
Day/s & Time/s: R: 5:30 - 8:20PM
McCrary, ToddRace & Ethnicity
FSP 164-14

Fake News and Alternative Facts: Information Literacy and Global Citizenship



Not merely a ripped-from-the-headlines cry against the national discourse that has emerged since the 2016 US Presidential election, this class aims to be a more thoughtful analysis of the phenomenon of resistance to (or actual disregard for) facts, evidence and expertise. Readings and assignments will focus not only on current conversation around fake news, but will also include an examination of the historical antecedents to alternative facts, with a particular emphasis on the paradox of emerging ignorance fueled by information overload. While there will be inevitable attention to examples from the modern US political landscape, course content will also consider the broader implications of willful ignorance and unquestioning acceptance of non-facts and half-truths—as these can serve as impediments to the expansive world view that’s essential for successful 21st Century global citizenship.

Course #: FSP 164-14
Professors: Lasher, Nancy & Bennett, Terrence
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 - 10:50AM
Lasher, Nancy & Bennett, TerrenceGlobal
FSP 161-05

Mind Hunters: What Really Makes a Murderer?



This course will utilize existing literature, lectures, and extensive class discussion to theoretically analyze extreme deviant behavior; specifically serial murder. The course will explore the psychosocial motivations of serial murderers, as well as how their media depiction often intensifies the cultural appetite for more information. The course will begin by briefly establishing a foundational knowledge of the reality of serial homicide in the United States and across the globe, inspect the difference between a psychopath and sociopath, and explore the typology (Holmes) and myths of serial killers. Class periods will be utilized for intense discussion surrounding the readings, as well as student discussion around their own comprehensive case study research.

Course #: FSP 161-05
Professor: Gallus, Elizabeth
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30pm-8:20pm
Gallus, Elizabeth
FSP 164-22

The Impact of Globalization



With the advancement of new technology, communications between people have been greatly enhanced. However, the initiatives and the practices of globalization, such as the results of exporting free market democracy, have created a complex series of economic, social, technological, cultural, and political changes in the world. This seminar addresses many relevant issues with respect to changes, conflicts, doubts, problems, and possible solutions. Students have a chance to read many resources as well as to watch many films to explore issues seriously, including the continuing struggle for development in poor countries; the relationship between globalization, inequality and poverty; the fate of cultural diversity in a globalizing world; and issues of gender, ethnicity, the environment, social justice, and human rights.

Course #: FSP 164-22
Professor: Pan, Alex
Day/s & Time/s: R: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Pan, Alex Global
FSP 163-07

Feminism, Gender and Advertising



This course will explore the relationship between femsinim, gender roels, and adveritsing. It will look at the historical and contemporary relationship between femisnims and advertising, including the ways in which markets co-opted feminist ideals and trends to sell women products. Gender scholars call this commodity feminism. Students will learn about the current and historical ways in which commodity feminism is (and has been) used to target them as consumers.

Course #: FSP 163-07
Professor: Nicolosi, Ann Marie
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2 - 3:20PM
Nicolosi, Ann MarieGender
FSP 164-02

Human Ability: Unplugged



“Disability is not a ‘brave struggle’ or ‘courage in the face of adversity’ . . . disability is an art. It’s an ingenious way to live.” - Neil Marcus

This quote by Neil Marcus reflects the central focus of this seminar regarding the study of human ability and the struggle among people perceived as more different than alike. Mr. Marcus is a poet, humorist, writer, actor and a self-proclaimed adventurer who is creatively endowed with disability. His disability denies his ability to speak, stand, walk and/or control sudden and bizarre movements. The study of disability as a key aspect of human experience equal with race, class, gender, sex, and sexual orientation will be explored through an alternate postmodern paradigm that views difference from a variety of angles. The course will commence and terminate with an attempt to define “Human-ness” or the parameters of what makes us “human”. This will be compared to the human variability that we experience in our societies, communities and civilizations. This study of ability has important political, social, and economic import for society as a whole, including both disabled and non-disabled people. Not only can this can this course of study help elevate the place of people of different abilities within society, but it can also add valuable perspective on a broad range of ideas, issues, and policies. Students will explore models and theories that examine social, political, cultural, and economic factors that define disability and help determine personal and collective responses to difference. At the same time, coursework will focus on de-stigmatizing disease, illness, and impairment, including those that cannot be measured or explained by biological science. This seminar will be closely aligned to the new course of study at TCNJ for students with intellectual disabilities: Career and Community Studies Certificate Program. This is a program (https://ccs.tcnj.edu/) with in the School of Education that implements a post-secondary course of study for a small cohort of youth 18-25 with intellectual and or developmental disabilities that desire a college experience that leads to adult roles and responsibilities. It is expected that through collaborative and controlled experiences, students in this seminar and the new certificate program will jointly benefit from exploring the course themes. In addition, the course will include a variety of instructional methodologies including review of human ability within popular culture, film, and music.

Course #: FSP 164-02
Professor: Schuler, Amy K.
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Schuler, Amy K.Global
FSP 161-01

Leaders Are Made, Not Born: Leadership Development at TCNJ



The class is designed to engage participants in recognizing and developing their leadership potential in themselves, the college, and their community. The course includes the study of leadership and application of leadership theories, concepts, and skills. Students will gain a better understanding of their own leadership potential through leadership assessments, exploration of values, and skill development. This interactive class will be looking at leadership through a variety of stories, readings, videos, and activities. At the end of the course, we hope that you have gained the skills to become a better student leader and to actively engage in and impact the College community.

Course #: FSP 161-01
Professor: Rana, Avani
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30am-10:50am
Rana, Avani
FSP 164-24

Sustainable Transportation



This course will introduce students to the multiple facets of sustainable transportation through a combination of lectures, readings, media presentations and discussions. The course is specifically intended to provide students with a broad-based, multi-disciplinary introduction to sustainable transportation from a local, national, and global perspective. Students are introduced to the concept of transportation systems as it relates to the everyday movement of people and goods and the relationships to current issues of sustainability. Students will be tasked to think critically about the interconnectedness of natural, technological, cultural and economic issues surrounding transportation systems and how they can be preserved for future users.

Course #: FSP 164-24
Professor: Brennan, Tom
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 - 10:50AM
Brennan, TomGlobal
FSP 164-01

Human Ability: Unplugged



“Disability is not a ‘brave struggle’ or ‘courage in the face of adversity’ . . . disability is an art. It’s an ingenious way to live.” - Neil Marcus

This quote by Neil Marcus reflects the central focus of this seminar regarding the study of human ability and the struggle among people perceived as more different than alike. Mr. Marcus is a poet, humorist, writer, actor and a self-proclaimed adventurer who is creatively endowed with disability. His disability denies his ability to speak, stand, walk and/or control sudden and bizarre movements. The study of disability as a key aspect of human experience equal with race, class, gender, sex, and sexual orientation will be explored through an alternate postmodern paradigm that views difference from a variety of angles. The course will commence and terminate with an attempt to define “Human-ness” or the parameters of what makes us “human”. This will be compared to the human variability that we experience in our societies, communities and civilizations. This study of ability has important political, social, and economic import for society as a whole, including both disabled and non-disabled people. Not only can this can this course of study help elevate the place of people of different abilities within society, but it can also add valuable perspective on a broad range of ideas, issues, and policies. Students will explore models and theories that examine social, political, cultural, and economic factors that define disability and help determine personal and collective responses to difference. At the same time, coursework will focus on de-stigmatizing disease, illness, and impairment, including those that cannot be measured or explained by biological science. This seminar will be closely aligned to the new course of study at TCNJ for students with intellectual disabilities: Career and Community Studies Certificate Program. This is a program (https://ccs.tcnj.edu/) with in the School of Education that implements a post-secondary course of study for a small cohort of youth 18-25 with intellectual and or developmental disabilities that desire a college experience that leads to adult roles and responsibilities. It is expected that through collaborative and controlled experiences, students in this seminar and the new certificate program will jointly benefit from exploring the course themes. In addition, the course will include a variety of instructional methodologies including review of human ability within popular culture, film, and music.

Course #: FSP 164-01
Professor: Schuler, Amy K.
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11 - 12:20PM
Schuler, Amy K.Global
FSP 164-11

Global Representations of Healthcare and its Professions in Media: 1950- present



This freshman seminar will explore how the healthcare system and its professionals are represented from both a global and historical perspective. Non-fiction and fiction literature, news media, movies, television shows and videogames are explored to both describe how health and healthcare providers are imagined in these media sources as well as to compare those representations across time and culture. Emphasis is placed on critical analysis of media in both classroom discussion and in written essays and papers.

Course #: FSP 164-11
Professor: Kartoz, Connie
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 - 1:50PM
Kartoz, ConnieGlobal
FSP 164-07

Shakespeare and Film



This course will focus on the treatment and adaptation of selected Shakespeare plays on film. In addition to considering the ways that film techniques influence our viewing experience, we will focus on the larger issues that Shakespeare’s work address and how those issues are relevant in present day.

Course #: FSP 164-07
Professor: Connolly, Maureen
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Connolly, MaureenGlobal
FSP 162-02

Multicultural New York: The City from its Beginnings to the Present



Is New York really the capital of the world? How did it become such a great multicultural city? What does it mean to be a New Yorker? These are some of the essential questions that will guide us as we study the events that shaped New York’s multicultural history from its beginnings to the present. As we explore different periods of the city's history some of the areas we will focus on are immigration, changing neighborhoods, crime, technology, quality of life, money, power, culture and art. Our course time will be divided between lectures/presentations, in-class discussion, and real world experiences.

Course #: FSP 162-02
Professor: Winkel, Matthew
Day/s & Time/s: M: 5:30-8:20PM
Winkel, MatthewRace & Ethnicity
FSP 161-48

Skepticism: Mythbusting, Pseudoscience, and Baloney Detection



This course will teach the essential skill of critical thinking and skepticism. Through exploring peoples ability to perceive their surroundings correctly we will look at how easily we are deceived in everyday life and why people believe weird things. From magic to dousing, and from palm reading to internet viral videos you will learn how to test these myths and pseudoscience and learn to be a skeptical person.

Course #: FSP 161-48
Professor: Elderkin, Curt
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30-10:50AM
Elderkin, Curt
FSP 162-06

The Perfect Storm: Puerto Rico, an Island in Crisis



The course will explore the long term impact of the relationship between Puerto Rico and United States since 1898. This course begins by analysing the response of the US government after Hurricanes Maria and Irma. We will examine several US policies that have impacted the historical context of the island in relation to politics, economics and social movements. Discussions will focus on what’s happening now, while critically thinking about the infrastructure of the Island, the current relationship with US, and the exodus of Puerto Ricans into the mainland USA. One of the ultimate goals is to encourage students to develop a sense of global awareness and consider responsible approaches to global issues and policies.

Course #: FSP 162-06
Professors: Figueroa-Vega, Paula & Raimundi-Petroski, Maritza
Day/s & Time/s: M: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Figueroa-Vega, Paula & Raimundi-Petroski, MaritzaRace & Ethnicity
FSP 161-14

Apocolypse Now



The media is saturated with cries of the apocalypse with news outlets regularly covering religious and astrological doomsday prophets. Survivalists have television shows teaching their skills and zombie movies are frequent box office hits. Our culture both fears and craves the end days. What does this say about humanity and its innate settings? To what extent does fear of the apocalypse mirror uncertainties of our own times? Does this fear represent humanity at its worst, or can it be indicative of the great reaches we can accomplish? This course will explore those questions, and will use fiction, film, and a number of articles as prompts to write about issues such as hope, fear, religion, and perseverance.

Course #: FSP 161-14
Professor: Schmidt, Randy
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11:00am-12:20pm
Schmidt, Randy
FSP 161-02

The Necessity of Theatre



Is theatre still necessary in the age of new media? Do we need theatre and performance to help provide an understanding of the world in which we live and the life that we inhabit? In this seminar, we will explore these questions (with a little help from Plato and Aristotle) before reading and viewing several classic and contemporary plays and musicals, each characterizing a different dramatic viewpoint or style of theatrical representation. In addition to class discussion of the plays and relevant readings, students will participate in a field trip to attend a professional production and meet with its production team, write two analytical essays, participate in a formal online discussion, and complete several brief writing exercises that explore the nature of academic writing. (This is a theatre appreciation course, not a performance-based or acting course; no prior knowledge of theatre is required or expected).

Course #: FSP 161-02
Professor: Muller, David
Day/s & Time/s: TR: 5:30pm-6:50pm
Muller, David
FSP 164-12

Know your food



Food has been a central component of cultural traditions throughout history and around the world. Industrialized agriculture and globalization have provided food security and easy access to a variety of foods for many people. Technological advances, particularly in the US, have allowed a few people to produce food for many. That means that most Americans are far removed from the actual plants and animals from which our food is produced. This disconnect makes it difficult to truly know your food and understand where it came from, how it was processed, and how food production impacts your health. It also makes it difficult to understand the hidden costs of food, such as environmental and health costs. This course will explore a variety of ways that people do or do not know their food. Because food security is a global issue, this course will explore TCNJ Liberal Learning outcomes related to global issues and awareness. We will read books, watch movies, talk to farmers, and explore traditions relating to food and food culture. Students will write about, present and discuss their perspectives and misunderstandings about food and food culture.

Course #: FSP 164-12
Professor: Thornton, Leeann
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11 - 12:20PM
Thornton, LeeannGlobal
FSP 161-49

The Arts as a Force for Social Change: American Movers and Shakers Since 1900



By taking a close look at major movements of the 20th century in fine art, dance, and film, in this course we will explore the ways in which artists have confronted social injustice and developed a language unique to their form and vision to create awareness and inspire change. From entertainment to protest, art has been used in a variety of ways on stages and buildings, in the street, museums, and books, to unite, incite, and teach. We’ll evaluate whether art is “plagiarism or revolution,†as Gauguin proposed, the vision behind the creative act, and to what degree artists both reflect and shape culture. Our study will also allow us to address the limitations and benefits of technology, the effectiveness of art as a force for social change, and the possibilities for expression and impact through multimedia art. The class may involve a CEL component in Trenton, tbd.

Course #: FSP 161-49
Professor: Deaver, Karen
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2-3:20PM
Deaver, Karen
FSP 161-47

Language, Languages, and Society



In this course, we study what makes human language different from the communication systems used by other species and look at the systems that all languages use to build meaning. Then we take up the question of how we use language in social contexts among friends, family, classmates, colleagues, supervisors, strangers, as well as with health care professionals. We consider what makes an accent an accent, that associations and impressions accents generate, and look at language-based bias and stereotyping. We also study how babies acquire the language of their parents, the nature of bilingualism, and how adults learn a second or foreign language. The course examines the relationship of language and ethnicity by analyzing particular languistic situations in depth. As part of this course, students engage in ESL tutoring in Trenton to fulfill the CEL requirement.

Course #: FSP 161-47
Professor: Stillman, David
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30-1:50PM
Stillman, David
FSP 161-08

Love and Hate



This course will investigate how love and hate have been represented in American literature and media. Together, we will investigate the sources of love and hate, arguably the strongest interpersonal passions. What causes us to desire others? What are the origins and effects of bigotry and resentment? Our readings will range widely, drawing on many genres, from poetry and fiction to film and song lyrics. A secondary aim of the course will be to introduce students to the practices of critical reading and writing.

Course #: FSP 161-08
Professor: Tuckman, Melissa
Day/s & Time/s: M: 5:30pm-8:50pm
Tuckman, Melissa
FSP 164-06

Global Issues, Local Impacts: Trenton, NJ & Athens, Greece



Many problems that contemporary societies face are intellectually challenging and unlikely to be solved by a one person or one disciplinary approach. This course aims to help students to recognize the difficulty of such issues, to give them the skills to recognize and begin to address global problems, to understand the value of cross-cultural collaboration, and to help them communicate across borders and cultures. The course will examine approaches to studying the world and emphasize hands-on experience while focusing on global issues at the local level as a way to provide a foundation for understanding and participating in local change that will have global impact. The focus will be on on global problems and challenges common to all people, and students will be challenged to develop interdisciplinary perspectives, problem-solving abilities, collaborative skills, an appreciation of difference, and leadership abilities. These skills will be strengthened by two high impact experiences: community engagement activities in Trenton during the fall semester, and service learning conducted during a two-week study abroad experience in Athens, Greece in January. These places will provide important points of access to the study of global issues. Students will see firsthand the effects of people who are affected by global challenges like poverty, religious conflict, immigration, discrimination, and economic decline, both in Trenton and in Athens. In the process, they will learn how personal experiences are connected to universal ones, so that they can understand perspectives different than their own, and learn to communicate effectively across cultural barriers.

Course #: FSP 164-06
Professors: Riccardi, Lee Ann & Bateup, Joanne
Day/s & Time/s: MW: 5:30 - 6:50PM
Riccardi, Lee Ann & Bateup, JoanneGlobal
FSP 161-10

The Seduction of Horror & Human Behavior



For some people there is a distinct sensation that occurs when entranced by a favorite Horror movie, one that is riddled with questions such as, “What would I do in that situation?”, “How would I react differently and would that make me less human?” or “Why does this scare me?” This course will examine modern Horror texts, secondary essays, and visual media in order to explore philosophies of the genre while analyzing human behavior in various, and disturbing, situations. Some of the primary texts include Stephen King's "The Shining", Robert Kirkman's "The Walking Dead" graphic novels, and Richard Matheson’s “I Am Legend". While examining these texts, we will focus on such overarching questions as “Do reactionary decisions define what it is to be human?” and “What is the relationship between human identity, psychological reaction, and circumstantial influences?”. (Disclaimer: Due to the graphic and explicit nature of the content for both the Horror literature and movies, it is highly recommended that you do not take this course if you are squeamish).

Course #: FSP 161-10
Professor: Dittmer, Nicole
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 5:30pm-6:50pm
Dittmer, Nicole
FSP 161-26

Quest for Happiness



What defines happiness? This course is a guided approach to navigating many facets of “happiness” including physical, emotional, social, intellectual, financial and spiritual aspects of life as a young adult. The objective of this course aims to explore what a “happy life” really means. Topics focus on emphasizing the importance of maintaining a healthy life style (physical), acknowledging psychological needs and challenges (emotional), establishing a positive relationship with family and the community (social), developing a strong sense of fiscal responsibility (financial), being open mind to new ideas (intellectual) and recognizing value and the meaning of life (spiritual). This course will incorporate various activities to engage students through discussion, hands on activities, projects, readings and reflections. Students will leave this course with a deeper and mindful understanding about the meaning of a “happy life” as they move forward as an undergraduate and beyond.

Course #: FSP 161-26
Professor: Chiang, Bea Bih Horng
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30pm-1:50pm
Chiang, Bea Bih Horng
FSP 161-15

The History of Disease



The media is saturated with cries of the apocalypse with news outlets regularly covering religious and astrological doomsday prophets. Survivalists have television shows teaching their skills and zombie movies are frequent box office hits. Our culture both fears and craves the end days. What does this say about humanity and its innate settings? To what extent does fear of the apocalypse mirror uncertainties of our own times? Does this fear represent humanity at its worst, or can it be indicative of the great reaches we can accomplish? This course will explore those questions, and will use fiction, film, and a number of articles as prompts to write about issues such as hope, fear, religion, and perseverance.

Course #: FSP 161-15
Professor:: King, Rita Mary
Day/s & Time/s: MW: 5:30pm-6:50pm
King, Rita Mary
FSP 161-37

Social Justice in the Past and Present



By what principles is the just society to be envisaged? What does it mean to say that we have rights? How are ethical values and ideas of social justice linked to religious belief and secular philosophical concepts? This seminar compares ancient and medieval views on such issues with those of the modern world. Discussions will focus on a selection of pre-modern and modern writings representative of different world cultures, some modern films, and news reports on current events.

Course #: FSP 161-37
Professor: Chazelle, Celia
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11:00am-12:20pm
Chazelle, Celia
FSP 161-11

Music and the Natural World



This course introduces elementary topics and tools of music, philosophy, anthropology, physics, biology and other fields to examine aspects of the relationship between the natural world and the music of human society. Beginning with a discussion of the possible origins and purposes of music, we trace the thread of environmental influence in musical styles. Historical and current examples from Western Classical music are considered, including sound installations, as well as non-Western traditions, folk styles and commercial music. We end with observations of nature in virtual performances and environments of the digital age and speculation of nature's continued role in the future evolution of the musical experience.

Course #: FSP 161-11
Professor: Wilkinson, Carlton
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Wilkinson, Carlton
FSP 161-20

The Art and Study of Peer Mentorship



"Few things help an individual more than to place responsibility upon him and to let him know you trust him” -- Booker T. Washington. Trust and responsibility are two important skills when developing a positive mentor/mentee relationship. This course will examine and promote skill development in the current evidence-based practices that are reflected in the provision of mentorship among peers with an emphasis on youth (ages 18-25). This course will also focus on developing one’s own interpersonal behavior skills including active listening, verbal/non-verbal communication, building trust, self-management, etc. Students will be instructed in both the theory and practice of providing mentorship to peers that are at-risk. Practice in skill development will be implemented through a field component that provides support to students with intellectual / developmental disabilities.

Course #: FSP 161-20
Professor: DeMonte, Bryana Bonfanti
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30pm-8:50pm
DeMonte, Bryana Bonfanti
FSP 161-22

Deadly Poison or Saving Grace? - The History and Science of Modern Insecticides



This course is a comprehensive examination of the history and role of modern insecticides from a scientific perspective. Modern insecticides have had a global impact on society and environment– from eradicating human disease, protecting our forests, and to enhancing the quality of our agriculture. At the same time, insecticides have been linked to ecological turmoil, pollution, and numerous secondary health issues. During this course, we will examine the evolution of insecticide use in our society. By learning the history and science of insecticides, students will develop a better understanding of how to assess the benefits and risks of this important group of agents.

Course #: FSP 161-22
Professor: Sen, Stephanie
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2 - 3:20PM
Sen, Stephanie
FSP 162-07

Performing the World: Introduction to Applied Theatre



Applied Theatre is an approach to drama that can sometimes seem traditional and other times be non-traditional. It often explores marginalized communities, education, and wider issues relating to social justice. In this class we will read and analyze existing works of applied theatre in addition to exploring opportunities to create theatre. This class is interactive and participants should expect to engage in reading, writing, speaking and listening. There will be a lot of opportunities to practice performance through improvisational acting and Theatre of the Oppressed techniques.

Course #: FSP 162-07
Professor: Dell'Angelo, Tabitha
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11 - 12:20PM
Dell'Angelo, TabithaRace & Ethnicity
FSP 164-25

Introduction to Amateur Radio



This course will cover the history of communications leading to the birth of amateur radio and the historic development of the hobby. It will also cover radio amateur's contributions to the advancement of electronics technology and in public service. Special facets of the hobby such as digital communications/use of the Internet/WiFi, space communications and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) will be discussed. The basic electronics and regulations needed for an amateur radio license will be provided. Everyone attending the course should leave with an amateur radio license.

Course #: FSP 164-25
Professor: Katz, Al
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2 - 3:20PM
Katz, AlGlobal
FSP 162-09

Race, Gender and Sexuality in Popular Culture



Course will explore various constructions of race, gender, sexuality in popular culture such as television, film and music.

Course #: FSP 162-09
Professor: Adair, Zakiya
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11 - 12:20PM
Adair, ZakiyaRace & Ethnicity
FSP 161-21

Exploring Amish Culture



This course is designed to be an introduction to Amish culture, more specifically, the Old Order Amish, the most conservative group of Amish living in the United States. Through course work designed to acquaint students with a social/ historical/political and educational perspective of the Amish, students will gain a better understanding of this fascinating, complex culture. Resisting change in a technological world is a constant struggle for the Amish who shun electricity, automobiles, and other modern conveniences. Since the Amish eschew individual accomplishment, this course will dwell on the Amish as a “Little Community”, how the community is distinct and self-sufficient, how the Amish depend on the resources of the non-Amish community, and how they adapt to change. The course will also clarify some of the major differences between Amish and Mennonite culture, differences that many outsiders are curious about but do not understand. Life ceremonies such as birth, marriage, and death will be investigated as well as social change and illness issues, for example, Amish medical behavior and problems, mental illness, and suicide patterns. Finally, the class will travel to Lancaster County, PA to enjoy a home cooked meal and a hay ride with an Amish family.

Course #: FSP 161-21
Professor: Hornberger, Timothy
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11:00am-12:20pm
Hornberger, Timothy
FSP 161-38

Social Justice in the Past and Present



By what principles is the just society to be envisaged? What does it mean to say that we have rights? How are ethical values and ideas of social justice linked to religious belief and secular philosophical concepts? This seminar compares ancient and medieval views on such issues with those of the modern world. Discussions will focus on a selection of pre-modern and modern writings representative of different world cultures, some modern films, and news reports on current events.

Course #: FSP 161-38
Professor: Chazelle, Celia
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2:00pm-3:20pm
Chazelle, Celia
FSP 161-12

Emotional Literacy



This course will provide students with opportunities to explore and develop their emotional intelligence and fluency. Through readings, class discussions and course assignments, students will be encouraged to explore different aspects of their emotional lives including triggers, coping style, habituated responses, genetic predispositions and affective tolerance. Students will learn to orient to their emotions in new and exciting ways by practicing a mindfulness based approach to emotional intelligence and personal development. The notion of emotions as conveyors of valuable messages will be reviewed, in addition to how emotions are generated and processed in the brain and body. Emotional hijacking will be explored, as well as the concept of state shifting. Important interpersonal skills will be fostered throughout the course dialogue including self- awareness, perspective-taking, empathic listening and assertive self-expression.

Course #: FSP 161-12
Professor: Zamel, Pamela
Day/s & Time/s: R: 5:30pm-8:50pm
Zamel, Pamela
FSP 164-17

Morality, God, and Free Will



This seminar is about what it means to be human. Most people believe that there are moral rights and wrongs and a God (or gods) who cares about human moral conduct. They also believe that they themselves are “persons,” (intelligent selves, souls, or agents) who are continuous in time and have the free will to choose among alternative future possibilities. Yet few things are more difficult to substantiate than fundamental beliefs about morality, God, selfhood, and free will. We will examine and discuss the views of philosophers, religious thinkers, and contemporary scientists.

Course #: FSP 164-17
Professor: Kamber, Richard
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2 - 3:20PM
Kamber, RichardGlobal
FSP 161-41

Prosperity and Rational Optimism



For nearly all of human history, global poverty was the norm. Living standards began to improve only about 200 years ago. Since then, they've rocketed upward in many places around the world. What factors are responsible for beginning this unprecedented march of human progress? In this course, we'll explore the causes of modern prosperity and rational reasons to be optimistic about the future. The goal is to counter political, media, and academic biases toward pessimism that can lead people to take human progress for granted, to fabricate or exaggerate problems, and to propose solutions that threaten to kill the goose that lays the golden eggs. Sustaining a widely shared prosperity requires informed vigilance to preserve rather than erode the foundations of this remarkable historical anomaly.

Course #: FSP 161-41
Professor: Ruscio, John
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 9:30am-10:50am
Ruscio, John
FSP 164-18

Morality of Markets



Should we buy and sell sex, kidneys, human eggs and sperm, or votes? Should women be allowed to rent out their wombs to infertile couples, or prisoners be allowed to pay for "upgraded" prison cells? Should we condemn or condone the use of sweatshop labor? Should businesses be allowed to discriminate based on race, or gender, or sexual orientation? Should there be any moral limits to markets--or should everything be for sale? This class will address all of these issues, and more.

Course #: FSP 164-18
Professor: Taylor, James
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 - 10:50AM
Taylor, JamesGlobal
FSP 163-08

Gender and Sports



This course will examine the role gender has played and continues to play in shaping sports in our society. Students will examine the following topics: history of sports, homophobia & athletes, Title IX, women's and men's athletics in comparison, collegiate and professional athletics, gender & coaching, and representation of athletes in the media, as well as other issues.

Course #: FSP 163-08
Professor: Landreau, John
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 - 10:50AM
Landreau, JohnGender
FSP 161-51

Agenda 2030: Operationalizing



This course examines the United Nation¿s Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) and how you can help to achieve those goals. Over the next twelve years, countries, communities, companies, and individuals, will mobilize resources to end poverty, fight inequalities, tackle climate change, and build collaborative structures for peace through a series of 17 global goals. We will examine the goals, targets, and measures as we think about how the goals can collectively meet their overarching objective of creating meaning, opportunity and dignity for all people, with a particular emphasis on the TCNJ community. To this end, you will each prepare an action plan for your personal life and for the college. The course will examine the SDGs from a cross-disciplinary perspective drawing on social psychology, business, and public policy literature to inform both your actions and plans. This course will have an embedded community engagement portion.

Course #: FSP 161-51
Professor: Becker, Karen
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 3:30 - 4:50PM
Becker, Karen
FSP 161-42

Prosperity and Rational Optimism



For nearly all of human history, global poverty was the norm. Living standards began to improve only about 200 years ago. Since then, they've rocketed upward in many places around the world. What factors are responsible for beginning this unprecedented march of human progress? In this course, we'll explore the causes of modern prosperity and rational reasons to be optimistic about the future. The goal is to counter political, media, and academic biases toward pessimism that can lead people to take human progress for granted, to fabricate or exaggerate problems, and to propose solutions that threaten to kill the goose that lays the golden eggs. Sustaining a widely shared prosperity requires informed vigilance to preserve rather than erode the foundations of this remarkable historical anomaly.

Course #: FSP 161-42
Professor: Ruscio, John
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11:00am-12:20pm
Ruscio, John
FSP 164-09

History Through Film and Literature



In this class we will explore history through story and image. Specifically, we will look at the ethnic groups of Africa and Africa today. Then, we will explore the 1960s and 1970s, learning about Richard Nixon, hippies, and the Vietnam War. Finally, we will try to understand Afghanistan and the United States' involvement with that country in the 1980s through today. We will read Half of a Yellow Sun and watch Long Way Down and Blood Diamond; Frost/Nixon, and Charlie Wilson's War and Osama, among other novels and films.

Course #: FSP 164-09
Professor: Raskin, Donna
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 3:30 - 4:50PM
Raskin, DonnaGlobal
FSP 161-23

Nowhere to Hide



For the first time in history, our everyday activities are being observed by others. When we chat with a friend, shop for a new pair of shoes, acknowledge a post, drive our car, write a school paper, or share a meal with friends at a local restaurant, somebody is recording that activity. In this class, we will investigate the monitoring habits of businesses and governments and how these habits affect you and society. We will read books, watch movies, and listen to experts discuss issues around surveillance including those activities that may improve our lives and those that may hurt it. We will also explore practices business and government agencies can implement to protect our right to privacy and free us from constant surveillance without undermining advancements that could improve our lives.

Course #: FSP 161-23
Professor: Braender, Lynn
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2:30pm-3:20pm
Braender, Lynn
FSP 163-09

Gender and Sports



This course will examine the role gender has played and continues to play in shaping sports in our society. Students will examine the following topics: history of sports, homophobia & athletes, Title IX, women's and men's athletics in comparison, collegiate and professional athletics, gender & coaching, and representation of athletes in the media, as well as other issues.

Course #: FSP 163-09
Professor: Landreau, John
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11 - 12:20PM
Landreau, JohnGender
FSP 161-18

“I want my MTV! Representations and Memories of the 1980s”



This course examines contemporary representations of the moments and icons that defined the 1980s: MTV, Ronald Reagan, “The Breakfast Club,” white youths wanting to “be like Mike” (African-American basketball star Michael Jordan), AIDS, etc. It seeks to not only to appreciate how people of the 1980s saw themselves and their world, but also to grasp the means in which our present-day memories and perceptions of those events are different. We will first examine theories on memory, how people remember (and forget!), the importance of age and social context, and the ways in which the needs of the present alter our conception of the past. From there, we examine cultural representations of the 1980s, such as film, music, fashion, sports, literature, etc., which will serve as a window into that time. The heart of the course will be applying the theories of memory we learned to better understand the meanings contemporaries of the 1980s imputed into movies such as “Back to the Future” and how a song like “Born in the USA” was so often misinterpreted. By the end of the course, you will have both an appreciation of your parents’ generation and the intellectual tools to grasp how the nostalgia of the 1980s is shaped by people trying to make sense of the world in which they lived and live.

Course #: FSP 161-18
Professor: :Campo, Joseph
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30am-10:50am
Campo, Joseph
FSP 161-09

The Seduction of Horror & Human Behavior



For some people there is a distinct sensation that occurs when entranced by a favorite Horror movie, one that is riddled with questions such as, “What would I do in that situation?”, “How would I react differently and would that make me less human?” or “Why does this scare me?” This course will examine modern Horror texts, secondary essays, and visual media in order to explore philosophies of the genre while analyzing human behavior in various, and disturbing, situations. Some of the primary texts include Stephen King's "The Shining", Robert Kirkman's "The Walking Dead" graphic novels, and Richard Matheson’s “I Am Legend". While examining these texts, we will focus on such overarching questions as “Do reactionary decisions define what it is to be human?” and “What is the relationship between human identity, psychological reaction, and circumstantial influences?”. (Disclaimer: Due to the graphic and explicit nature of the content for both the Horror literature and movies, it is highly recommended that you do not take this course if you are squeamish).

Course #: FSP 161-10
Professor: Dittmer, Nicole
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 3:30pm-4:50pm
Dittmer, Nicole
FSP 161-24

Complementary and Alternative Medicine



The course explores traditional approaches to medical care in the United States, and several complementary and/or alternative approaches, for a wide range of health concerns. Some are common in the US (chiropractic, physical therapy, acupuncture, mental-health counseling), or ascendant (nutrition, supplements), and some much more in other countries (naturopathic, probiotics). Students will learn how to take a holistic or systemic approach to health and illness, to include side effects as well as direct effects of treatment, and to assess long-term consequences as well as short-term benefits of health interventions.

Course #: FSP 161-24
Professor: Naples, Michele
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 9:30am-10:50pm
Naples, Michele
FSP 164-10

The Art of Happiness, A Buddhist Perspective



This seminar seeks an interdisciplinary exploration of the nature and meanings of happiness and well-being from the Buddhist perspectives in philosophy, literature, religion, film and art. Students will read the basic teachings about happiness from both the Buddhist canons and the contemporary Buddhist thinkers (such as The Dalai Lama, Chögyam Trungpa and Thích Nhất Hạnh). Emphasis will be placed on the key concepts of happiness such as compassion, wisdom, mindfulness, affection, kindness, gratitude, right ethical conducts and mental/emotional cultivation. Students are encouraged to think about what it would mean to live a good and happy life by applying the teachings to their contemporary life and society.

Course #: FSP 164-10
Professor: Mi, Jiayan
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2 - 3:20PM
Mi, JiayanGlobal
FSP 161-17

Loving the Alien: The Music and Art of David Bowie



Famous as much for his musical catalog as his expression and manipulation of identity, David Bowie is one of the most influential musicians of the last fifty years. This section of the First Seminar Program will study Bowie’s lyrics as works of literature and his creation of meaning through a variety of literary techniques. Through an examination of his work and art, we will come to explore key topics such as: authenticity, alienation, nothing, yearning, and death. We will trace the evolution of the artist from Space Oddity, released in 1969, to Bowie’s final album, Black Star, released on Jan. 8, 2016, two days before he died. On this journey, we will also assess Bowie’s expression through diverse media platforms, including his multiple identities (Ziggy Stardust, The Thin White Duke, etc.), his music videos, paintings, and acting roles. We will endeavor to uncover how, as philosopher Simon Critchley states, “Through the fakery and because of it, we feel a truth that leads us beyond ourselves, toward the imagination of some other way of being.”

Course #: FSP 161-17
Professor:: King, Rita Mary
Day/s & Time/s: TR: 5:30pm-6:50pm
Layton, Shawn
FSP 162-11

Leadership for Social Justice



This interactive course examines the critical role of leadership in advancing social justice, with emphasis on successful and failed efforts to address social problems such as poverty, oppression, and the fight for civil rights in America. Together we will probe and critically evaluate several theories and models that attempt to define effective leadership for the public good. We will also engage in an evidence-based, case-study analysis of selected leaders, including famous and lesser known social justice activists, political leaders, and social entrepreneurs, in order to investigate the values, traits, and competencies associated with effective and ineffective social justice leadership. Texts and supplemental readings include non-fiction and fictional works examining root causes of social injustice, and the efforts of leaders to produce positive social change.

Course #: FSP 162-11
Professor: Scarpati, Antonino
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2 - 3:20PM
Scarpati, AntoninoRace & Ethnicity
FSP 164-26

The Power of Storytelling: Shaping Culture through Story



In this class we will address the need to create narrative and meaning out of the human experience. We will study ways in which stories are used in this endeavor. By examining global storytelling traditions including the oral storytelling tradition in African culture, Kathak dancing in Indian culture and the Blues in African American we will look at the role storytelling has played in shaping histories, passing down traditions and in binding communities/knitting communities together. We will also examine the building blocks and structure of stories paying close attention to perspective. Lastly we will examine the impact of technology and ways in which the production and consumption of mass produced stories molds (defines or distorts) our understanding of ourselves and others.

Course #: FSP 164-26
Professor: Johnson-Frizell, Lorna
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Johnson-Frizell, LornaGlobal
FSP 161-43

Corrupting the Youth



The Ancient Greek philosopher Socrates was accused, tried, imprisoned, and executed because he was thought to be such a threat to Athenian society. One of the charges was that of corrupting the youth. For those in power in the Athenian State this meant that Socrates taught young persons to think logically, to think for themselves, to be critical of what others tried to get them to believe, and to be critical about their own thinking-and they executed him to stop him. / In this course we will do like Socrates, and examine some foundational problems and issues in philosophy in order to acquire a skill/superpower that makes people nervous. We will start with basic concepts concerning the mind, knowledge and reality; and basic concepts of logic, logical analysis, validity and soundness. Then we will move on to the examination of the nature of knowledge and the problem of skepticism; the nature of knowledge and the problem of our knowledge of other minds; the nature of mind and the mind-body problem; and, finally, the nature of morality and the problem of moral criteria. I can't promise that anybody will get arrested or executed, but you never know. / / There are no prerequisites for this course. /

Course #: FSP 161-43
Professor: Preti, Consuelo
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11:00am-12:20pm
Preti, Consuelo
FSP 161-28

Writing the Academic "I"



In this course, the instructor leads students in a series of exploratory writing exercises, which address the question "How do 'I' fit into this world?" We spend the first half of the semester authoring a substantial amount of personal nonfiction on a broad range of topics including, but not limited to: socioeconomic strata, gender, race, sexuality, sexual orientation, religion, disability, popular culture, fear, love, and most likely even the kitchen sink. Students also conduct field experiences to generate writing topics, which include observation and service to the community. As the semester marches forward, students select pieces they wish to further develop and revise. Accessing library resources and librarians, students gather scholarship to analyze their own work by stepping outside of their narrative and becoming an ethnographer. They seek to find the meaning of their experiences in the context of larger social realities. In short, this this a thinking, experiencing, and feeling autoethographic journey.

Course #: FSP 161-28
Professor: Singer, Steven
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2:00pm-3:20pm
Singer, Steven
FSP 161-35

Star Wars: Films & Adaptations


“Star Wars: Films & Adaptations” examines the original movie trilogy (Episodes IV, V, VI) as well as the prequels (I, II, III), and other Star Wars films released since Disney purchased Lucasfilm.. We also read one Star Wars novel, watch selected episodes of the Star Wars animated TV series (both Clone Wars series and Star Wars Rebels), and read about and discuss other ancillary creations (e.g. video games, collectibles, Jediism) that make up the Star Wars cultural phenomenon. Our approach is interdisciplinary: film studies, literature, philosophy, religious studies, history, sociology, anthropology, economics/marketing, other. The primary sources analyzed are the fictional works created by George Lucas and others; secondary sources include books and articles in a variety of disciplines. The final project is a research paper on a topic related to Star Wars. If you haven’t already watched all the films, please do so over the summer since we won’t be able to avoid spoilers in our reading and discussion.

Course #: FSP 161-35
Professor: Konkle, Lincoln
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11 - 12:20PM
Konkle, Lincoln
FSP 164-15

Rock ‘N’ Roll in Post-Mao China



This course seeks to study the Rock ‘n’ Roll music and culture that emerged in the Post-Mao Mainland China from the early 1980s to the present. By situating Chinese Rock (C-rock) in the dramatically changing historical, cultural and political context, the seminar examines critically how Rock ‘n’ Roll music shapes the heterogeneous identity of Post-Mao and Post-socialist China. Through careful analysis of the lyrics, musical style, MTV and films, the seminar explores topics such as rebellious youth culture and political ideology, influence of Western music and traditional Chinese music, underground subculture and urban space, transgressive passion and censorship, band culture, performance poetics and global capital, and, gender, sexuality and body identity.

Course #: FSP 164-15
Professor: Mi, Jiayan
Day/s & Time/s: T: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Mi, JiayanGlobal
FSP 164-08

Living Hinduism: Applied consciousness and influence on society and environment



The course introduces to over five thousand-year-old religious traditions of South Asia that are often labeled as Hinduism. Representing unusually diverse traditions, Hinduism is the dominant faith in India and an influential spiritual force around the globe. From the ancient texts and historical and modern philosophical speculations, three primary Hindu paths - ritual, renunciation, and devotion will be discussed. We will look at the influence of practicing this age-old traditional knowledge in daily lives and how it raises consciousness/awareness and its effect on society, sustainability, and environment. The course will be augmented with the use of multimedia showcasing movie clips, and field trips along with the discussion on modern perspectives. / Fourth-hour requirement for the course: The students are assigned additional learning tasks that make the semester’s learning experience more deeply engaged and rigorous, and no additional classroom space is needed.

Course #: FSP 164-08
Professor: Paliwal, Manish
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 - 1:50PM
Paliwal, ManishGlobal
FSP 161-29

Social Media and Hashtag Activism



The course will explore the impact that social media (SM) has on political decision-making and makers. First, we will establish definitions for such constructs as social media and activism. The course will then trace the origins of hashtag activism and look at some of the most effective examples of social media's influence on policymakers. Our journey includes the various ways social activism is displayed on different SM platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat, MarcoPolo, etc), and will include a consideration of the best practices in this area. Students will actively engage in studying a social media activism case on their favorite subject, and they will (theoretically) develop a campaign for SM activism on a topic of strong interest.

Course #: FSP 161-29
Professor: Rouse, LaMont
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 - 1:50PM
Rouse, LaMont
FSP 161-33

The Mirror Ball of Stress



This course engages first year students in thinking more deeply about stress and stressors at personal, interpersonal, institutional and community levels. Through interactive, project and evidence-based approaches, students will explore what stressor are in their own lives. They will also examine impacts on health and well-being of individuals and populations representing a variety of ethnic, linguistic, age or geographic-specific communities. Particular emphasis will be on impacts of stress on learning and educational experiences of students. Students will develop definitions of stress from multiple sectors, taking into account such aspects as physiology, social-emotional, economic-finance, and political. / The course will employ a variety of data and information sources to analyze and interpret the types of impacts stressors.

Course #: FSP 161-33
Professor Gordon, Karen A.
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2:30pm-3:20pm
Gordon, Karen A.
FSP 161-30

Social Media and Hashtag Activism



The course will explore the impact that social media (SM) has on political decision-making and makers. First, we will establish definitions for such constructs as social media and activism. The course will then trace the origins of hashtag activism and look at some of the most effective examples of social media's influence on policymakers. Our journey includes the various ways social activism is displayed on different SM platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat, MarcoPolo, etc), and will include a consideration of the best practices in this area. Students will actively engage in studying a social media activism case on their favorite subject, and they will (theoretically) develop a campaign for SM activism on a topic of strong interest.

Course #: FSP 161-30
Professor: Rouse, LaMont
Day/s & Time/s: M: 5:30 - 8:20PM
Rouse, LaMont
FSP 162-10

Race, Gender and Sexuality in Popular Culture



Course will explore various constructions of race, gender, sexuality in popular culture such as television, film and music.

Course #: FSP 162-10
Professor: Adair, Zakiya
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 3:30 - 4:50PM
Adair, ZakiyaRace & Ethnicity
FSP 161-39

Walking in the Anthropocene



Charles Dickens writes that “The Sum of the whole is this: walk and be happy; walk and be healthy.” Is it really that simple? Has walking changed? Or have changes in our world altered our experiences with walking? So many great writers of the past—Wordsworth, Thoreau, Dickens—were avid walkers and hikers, but how is walking different for those of us living in times of environmental degradation. We will read fiction, poetry, and essays related to walking in the anthropocene--that period of time marked by the significant impact of humans on ecosystems. Focused on how creative writers respond to climate change, population density, and other signs of humanity’s reshaping of the Earth, this course will consider the art (as well as the need, frustrations, and challenges) of walking in the anthropocene.

Course #: FSP 161-39
Professor: Bennett, Charles
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11:00am-12:20pm
Bennett, Charles
FSP 161-31

Elements of Journalism



Students from the TCNJ campus and its surrounding communities will explore the foundational principles of journalism as well as the challenges and opportunities confronting news organizations covering Trenton and Mercer County. In collaborative teams, we will create news and editorial products that reflect the principles articulated in the seminal work, The Elements of Journalism: What Newspeople Should Know and The Public Should Expect, along with critiques and suggestions of ways to build a culturally responsive news ecosystem that fosters broad community engagement and cooperative problem-solving.

Course #: FSP 161-31
Professor: Pearson, Kim
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11:00am-12:20pm
Pearson, Kim
FSP 161-45

Incarceration Nation: The Literature of the Prison



This course will explore the literature by and about prisoners from 600 AD to the present. Interdisciplinary in nature, this seminar will weave together the studies of gender, criminology, psychology, sociology, history and culture. We will read provocative, groundbreaking texts written by one of the most neglected, silenced, but all-too-critical sectors of our population—the incarcerated.

Course #: FSP 161-45
Professor: Tarter, Michele
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 9:30am-10:50pm
Tarter, Michele
FSP 161-07

Themes in Graphic Literature



Graphic literature is often dismissed as “comic books.” However, in the last thirty years, graphic literature has been elevated to tell stories as varied as the Islamic Revolution in Iran and the coming-of-age of a lesbian teenager from Pennsylvania. In this seminar, we will explore both traditional superhero comics and graphic novels for unifying themes and cultural context

Course #: FSP 161-07
Professor: Hargreaves, Laura
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 3:30pm-4:50pm
Hargreaves, Laura
FSP 164-23

World Religions: An Economic Perspective



What difference does religion make for individuals and nations? How does religion relate, if any, to people’s educational attainments, household wealth, marriage and family decisions, and health outcomes? Are there time-money tradeoffs in religious participation? Does religion speed up or slow down the growth of countries? This seminar will provide an overview of world religions, with the United States serving as a reference point, before delving into the influence of religion on nations and individuals’ lives. Course discussions will be organized by world religions and follow examples from countries representative of regions around the world. This is a tentative course description and is subject to changes as needed.

Course #: FSP 164-23
Professor: Brodersen, Donka
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11 - 12:20PM
Brodersen, DonkaGlobal
FSP 162-01

Imprisoned Minds: Philosophy & Religion from Jail



In the history of philosophy and religion, many important works have been written by authors who were behind bars. This course introduces this extensive tradition and the concerns it raises. Such texts deal, not only with classical problems in the history of philosophy & theology, but also with concerns that many of us share today. Questions to be addressed include: “What is the meaning of life?” “Where can I find happiness?” “What does it mean to live in freedom?” “What can be done about injustice and oppression?” Readings include works by Plato, Boethius, Gandhi, Martin Luther King, Jr., & Aung San Suu Kyi.

Course #: FSP 162-01
Professor: Edwards, Mark
Day/s & Time/s: T: 5:30-8:20
Edwards, MarkRace & Ethnicity
FSP 161-03

The Necessity of Theatre



Is theatre still necessary in the age of new media? Do we need theatre and performance to help provide an understanding of the world in which we live and the life that we inhabit? In this seminar, we will explore these questions (with a little help from Plato and Aristotle) before reading and viewing several classic and contemporary plays and musicals, each characterizing a different dramatic viewpoint or style of theatrical representation. In addition to class discussion of the plays and relevant readings, students will participate in a field trip to attend a professional production and meet with its production team, write two analytical essays, participate in a formal online discussion, and complete several brief writing exercises that explore the nature of academic writing. (This is a theatre appreciation course, not a performance-based or acting course; no prior knowledge of theatre is required or expected).

Course #: FSP 161-03
Professor: Muller, David
Day/s & Time/s: TR: 7:00pm-8:20pm
Muller, David
FSP 161-25

How College Works: Higher Education and American Society



The discussion about college in your family over the last year was personal: which college would you choose (and which ones would choose you), who was going to pay for your education, and what did you intend to study? There is widespread public debate about these issues too. Access to college, the costs of attendance, and the value of a degree are all being questioned by business and nonprofit executives, politicians, and educators. We examine this public debate about higher education; a debate that has intensified as the importance of college for individual success has increased and the resources available for higher education become more scarce.

Course #: FSP 161-25
Professor: Prensky, David
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2:30pm-3:20pm
Prensky, David
FSP 161-52

The Americanization of Mythology, and the Corporatizing of the Foundational Myth



One of the more notable trends in popular culture of the last ten years is the dominance in American cinema of comic book characters and movies. Fans of these characters often refer to the extensive stories built up around them as "mythologies" - but are they proper myths? What is the function of mythology in society, and how do these comic book characters and stories fulfill, defy, or disappoint these expectations?

This course will attempt to answer these questions by leading students to study the myths of previous societies and how they functioned within their original contexts, and then to compare these societies and their mythologies to the present day United States, and how myths are constructed here, both out of historical and fictional characters.

Course #: FSP 161-52
Professor: Dixon, Andrew
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 8 - 9:20AM
Dixon, Andrew
FSP 164-13

Fake News and Alternative Facts: Information Literacy and Global Citizenship



Not merely a ripped-from-the-headlines cry against the national discourse that has emerged since the 2016 US Presidential election, this class aims to be a more thoughtful analysis of the phenomenon of resistance to (or actual disregard for) facts, evidence and expertise. Readings and assignments will focus not only on current conversation around fake news, but will also include an examination of the historical antecedents to alternative facts, with a particular emphasis on the paradox of emerging ignorance fueled by information overload. While there will be inevitable attention to examples from the modern US political landscape, course content will also consider the broader implications of willful ignorance and unquestioning acceptance of non-facts and half-truths—as these can serve as impediments to the expansive world view that’s essential for successful 21st Century global citizenship.

Course #: FSP 164-13
Professors: Lasher, Nancy & Bennett, Terrence
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 8 - 9:20AM
Lasher, Nancy & Bennett, TerrenceGlobal
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