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2019 FSP Courses

The First Seminar (or FSP for short) is a small seminar-style class that all entering first-year students take during their first semester at TCNJ. The course enables entering students to work closely with a professor and their fellow students on a topic of their choosing outside of their major. It offers students an opportunity to engage in an intellectually exciting and challenging experience at the beginning of their college career.

Instructions

  1. Students in the Honors, Bonner, or W.I.L.L. program should go to the  “Honors” or “Bonner/W.I.L.L.” page for their program and follow the directions there; do not follow the directions below.
  2. Some departments and schools give specific advice on how to choose your FSP course.  Please check the “Major Specific FSP Info” page before picking your FSP.
  3. From the list of FSP courses, please pick six sections that interest you.
  4. Once you have chosen six FSP sections, please put them in your First Semester Worksheet.
  5. Your FSPs choices will not be ranked when entered into the First Semester Worksheet. One of your choices will be assigned to you as your FSP.
Class Name/Description Instructor Civic Responsibility
FSP 161-09

Alice's Adventures in the Wonderland of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics.

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland isn't just a children's fantasy story--it's a wild ride through some of the most fascinating issues in philosophy, politics, and economics. The Cheshire Cat's trick of gradually fading away raises questions of personal identity, the Mad Hatter's Tea party is based on Plato's discussion of what makes an act moral, and the race that Alice organizes for the wet animals is a criticism of democracy. Even the original illustrations refer to ideas: The pictures of the Mad Hatter show that he hasn't learned the economic advantages of specialization or the benefits of global trade. These issues were deliberately smuggled into the text by the author, Lewis Carroll--who was actually Charles Dodgson, a professor of mathematical logic. This course will explore these and other issues, through the novel, contemporary readings--and games!

Course #: FSP 161-09
Professor: Taylor, James
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

Taylor, James
FSP 163-13

Masculinities and Media

This course examines the social construction of gender generally and masculinity specifically, through the use of media. The course will explore how men are portrayed through film, advertisements, music, and art. Students will gain skills in media literacy and critique and build a foundational understanding of gender theory.

Course #: FSP 163-13
Professor: Gall, Zachary
Day/s & Time/s: TR: 5:30 PM-6:50 PM

Gall, Zachary Gender
FSP 161-38

The Necessity of Theatre?

Is theatre still necessary in the age of new media? Do we need theatre and performance to help provide an understanding of the world in which we live and the life that we inhabit? In this seminar, we will explore these questions (with a little help from Plato and Aristotle) before reading and viewing several classic and contemporary plays and musicals, each characterizing a different dramatic viewpoint or style of theatrical representation. In addition to class discussion of the plays and relevant readings, students will participate in a field trip to attend a professional production, write two analytical essays, participate in a formal online discussion, and complete several brief writing exercises that explore the nature of academic writing. (This is a theatre appreciation course, not a performance-based or acting course; no prior knowledge of theatre is required or expected).

Course #: FSP 161-38
Professor: Muller, David
Day/s & Time/s: TR: 5:30 PM-6:50 PM

Muller, David
FSP 161-31

The Art & Study of Peer Mentorship

Few things help an individual more than to place responsibility upon him and to let him know you trust him-- Booker T. Washington. Trust and responsibility are two important skills when developing a positive mentor/mentee relationship. This course will examine and promote skill development in the current evidence-based practices that are reflected in the provision of mentorship among peers with an emphasis on youth (ages 18-25). This course will also focus on developing one's own interpersonal behavior skills including active listening, verbal/non-verbal communication, building trust, self-management, etc. Students will be instructed in both the theory and practice of providing mentorship to peers that are at-risk. Practice in skill development will be implemented through a field component that provides support to students with intellectual / developmental disabilities.

Course #: FSP 161-31
Professor: Demonte, Bryana
Day/s & Time/s: M: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Demonte, Bryana
FSP 164-05

Global Issues Local Impacts

Many problems that contemporary societies face are intellectually challenging and unlikely to be solved by a one person or one disciplinary approach. This course aims to help students to recognize the difficulty of such issues, to give them the skills to recognize and begin to address global problems, to understand the value of cross-cultural collaboration, and to help them communicate across borders and cultures. The course will examine approaches to studying the world and emphasize hands-on experience while focusing on global issues at the local level as a way to provide a foundation for understanding and participating in local change that will have global impact. The focus will be on on global problems and challenges common to all people, and students will be challenged to develop interdisciplinary perspectives, problem-solving abilities, collaborative skills, an appreciation of difference, and leadership abilities. These skills will be strengthened by community engagement activities in Trenton during the fall semester. Students will see firsthand the effects of people who are affected by global challenges like poverty, religious conflict, immigration, discrimination, and economic decline. In the process, they will learn how personal experiences are connected to universal ones, so that they can understand perspectives different than their own, and learn to communicate effectively across cultural barriers.

Course #: FSP 164-05
Professor: Bateup, Joanne
Day/s & Time/s: TR: 7:00 PM-8:20 PM

Bateup, Joanne Global
FSP 164-22

"Let's Kill Hitler" - The Ethics of Time Travel

If you could go back in time and change history - should you? This course will explore how authors, filmmakers, philosophers, and scientists have sought to answer this question. In the end, students will be asked to make that choice for themselves. By examining fictional accounts of time travel in the context of various moral approaches, in conjunction with scientific theories on the nature of time itself, students will seek to understand how authors/artists have addressed the fundamental question: if you could change the past, would you?

Course #: FSP 164-22
Professor: Chalmers, Andrew
Day/s & Time/s: R: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Chalmers, Andrew Global
FSP 164-13

The Last of Us: a study of human nature and threats to humankind

In a civilization that controls almost all aspects of its environment, few people develop basic outdoor and low technology survival skills. This course uses survival instruction (primarily indoors) as a foundation for team building, leadership, and problems solving skill development. Students study survival texts, documentaries, and fictional films not to incite paranoia, but to create a tangible learning context to consider and analyze threats to human sustainability. These threats include overpopulation, resource depletion or environmental degradation, disease, war, and acts of nature. Students explore and write about these topics while participating in a game-like course structure that will promote campus and peer engagement.

Course #: FSP 164-13
Professor: Singer, Steven
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 3:30 PM-4:50 PM

Singer, Steven Global
FSP 161-40

Music and the Natural World

This course introduces elementary topics and tools of music, philosophy, anthropology, physics, biology and other fields to examine aspects of the relationship between the natural world and the music of human society. Beginning with a discussion of the possible origins and purposes of music, we trace the thread of environmental influence in musical styles. Historical and current examples from Western Classical music are considered, including sound installations, as well as non-Western traditions, folk styles and commercial music. We end with observations of nature in virtual performances and environments of the digital age and speculation of nature's continued role in the future evolution of the musical experience.

Course #: FSP 161-40
Professor: Wilkinson, Carlton
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Wilkinson, Carlton
FSP 161-06

Developing technology: From science fiction to reality

In this seminar course, we will use science fiction short stories, novels, and films to explore technologies introduced in science fiction and examine how those technologies were made reality. Students will explore how the technologies actually function from science and engineering perspectives and examine socioeconomic and ethical considerations. Possible topics include communication technologies, artificial intelligence & information analytics, health & healthcare, cyborgs & human enhancement, security & surveillance, virtual reality, and interfaces & wearables. The course will culminate in "creating" their own novel science fiction technology and then providing real world context by examining the current state of the art, identifying missing technological capabilities, and considering possible misuse or other negative effects.

Course #: FSP 161-06
Professor: Wagner, Christopher
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 AM-10:50 AM

Wagner, Christopher
FSP 164-26

Narratives, Health, and Illness

Narratives surround us. We are embodied stories and stories live through us as we are listeners/readers and storytellers. We make sense of our lives by means of stories—especially if we have experienced (or witnessed) illness and trauma. This interdisciplinary course sees narratives as texts, as a way of knowing (i.e., as a research tool of inquiry), and as way of self-knowing. For that reason, it combines theoretical insights from literary studies, medical anthropology, autobiographical studies, ethics, and the medical/health humanities. We will read illness narratives, memoirs, and graphic novels to learn how authors make sense of their own life experiences through creative means, as a way of repair and self-care. In addition, we will practice close reading and reflective writing to enhance interpretation, critical thinking, and communicative skills. This course is relevant for students who are especially interested in the intersection of the health professions and the humanities.

Course #: FSP 164-26
Professor: Delbene, Roxana
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 3:30 PM-4:50 PM

Delbene, Roxana Global
FSP 161-46

Writing Philosophical Children's Books

Students in FSP Writing Philosophical Children's Books have the opportunity to become conversant on selected philosophical topics, discuss ways of making philosophy accessible to P-12 students, practice community of inquiry learning, and develop philosophical readings into age-appropriate literature.

Course #: FSP 161-46
Professor: Seals, Greg
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

Seals, Greg
FSP 162-01

Looking at Race through Photography: Representations of American Whiteness

Our visual understanding of history has dominantly been shaped by photographs taken by white male photographers in a range of disciplines. In this course, we will discuss the uses and functions of photographs; how they can be understood and interpreted; whether they have clear-cut content and meaning; how they are informed by politics, economics, and social life; and specifically, the complex relationship of race and photography. The course explores the intersections of race, gender, and class (as historically constructed and culturally contingent) with the focus on whiteness and the White Gaze.

Course #: FSP 162-01
Professor: Allyn, Anita
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Allyn, Anita Race & Ethnicity
FSP 163-10

Horror in the Novel

In this course we will read and discuss a variety of horror novels such as Mark Z. Danielewski's House of Leaves, Henry James's The Turn of the Screw, Shirley Jackson's The Haunting of Hill House, and Robert Louis Stevenson's Dr. Jekyll and My. Hyde. Because horror often begins in the home, we will explore the roles of women and men in these novels in the family and in the larger social world. In particular we will examine the representations of the villain, the mother, the monster, and the victim, asking how expectations about femininity and masculinity shape these identities. From there we will theorize about how monstrosity is viewed in our world in contrast to how it is viewed in the texts.

Course #: FSP 163-10
Professor: Kranzler, Laura
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

Kranzler, Laura Gender
FSP 164-29

Language, Languages, and Society

In this course, we study what makes human language different from the communication systems used by other species and look at the systems that all languages use to build meaning. Then we take up the question of how we use language in social contexts among friends, family, classmates, colleagues, supervisors, strangers, as well as with health care professionals. We consider what makes an accent an accent, that associations and impressions accents generate, and look at language-based bias and stereotyping. We also study how babies acquire the language of their parents, the nature of bilingualism, and how adults learn a second or foreign language. The course examines the relationship of language and ethnicity by analyzing particular languistic situations in depth. As part of this course, students engage in ESL tutoring in Trenton to fulfill the CEL requirement.

Course #: FSP 164-29
Professor: Stillman, David
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

Stillman, David Global
FSP 164-08

Women Writing the Past: Fiction, History, and Autobiography

This course offers a study of fiction, film, and autobiography by women of color whose work demonstrates the "presence of the past" in late 20th-century life. We will read a sampling of authors who have origins in Jamaica, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, China, and the US for the specific ways in which they construct and reconstruct the past through literature. As we read each text, we will interrogate the myths and legends that have come to be known as "history" and look at the methods, artifacts, and sources each author uses to acquaint readers with imaginative alternatives to "official records" of the past. We will also study the lesser known personal histories of the authors' lives as well as the personal lives of the lesser-known historical figures who are forgotten by the past but "remembered" by the authors.

Course #: FSP 164-08
Professor: Ortiz-Vilarelle, Lisa
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 AM-10:50 AM

Ortiz-Vilarelle, Lisa Global
FSP 163-06

Gender and Citizenship

This course will explore the relationship between gender and citizenship. It will investigate the ways in which citizenship has differed for men, and women (including transgender citizens). Students will study the relationship between citizenship rights, responsibilities and gender roles, as well as issues of sexuality and gender identity. Included in this course will be discussions of the meanings of citizenship, the history of citizenship and current issues in citizenship debates such as immigration.

Course #: FSP 163-06
Professor: Nicolosi, Annmarie
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 9:30 AM-10:50 AM

Nicolosi, Annmarie Gender
FSP 162-02

Diversity and Its Responses

Living in the United States, it is clear that ethnic and racial diversity matter. However, why diversity matters, what its origins are, and what are appropriate responses to issues of diversity are all questions that have generated differing viewpoints and reactions from scholars, policymakers, theorists and ordinary citizens throughout this country’s history. In this course, we examine what diversity is, what it looks like in the United States, and how individuals, groups and states have responded to ethnic and racial diversity in their midst. We will focus on debates over diversity such as whether race is “real” or not; whether assimilation or pluralism represent ideal goals; and whether policies such as affirmative action are appropriate responses to issues of race and inequality.

Course #: FSP 162-02
Professor: Chartock, Sarah
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 AM-10:50 AM

Chartock, Sarah Race & Ethnicity
FSP 164-11

Art of Happiness from a Buddhist Perspective

This seminar seeks to explore the nature and meanings of happiness from a Buddhist perspective. Students will read the basic teachings about happiness from both the Buddhist canons and the contemporary Buddhist thinkers (such as The Dalai Lama, Chögyam Trungpa and Thích Nhất Hạnh). Emphasis will be placed on the key concepts of happiness such as compassion, wisdom, mindfulness, affection, kindness, gratitude, right ethical conducts and mental/emotional cultivation. Students are encouraged to think about what it would mean to live a good and happy life by applying the teachings to their contemporary life and society.

Course #: FSP 164-11
Professor: Mi, Jia-Yan
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

Mi, Jia-Yan Global
FSP 163-01

LGBTQ and Popular Culture

This course explores LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer) identity, culture, and politics by way of their representations in popular and independent films/documentaries, as well as in other forms of mass media. I often share with students that there are at least three major reasons for why there's been a significant shift globally in terms of pro LGBTQ civil and human rights. First, many anti-gay laws are being challenged and repealed (e.g., anti-gay marriage laws). Second, many people now personally know friends, family members, and co-workers who identify as LGBTQ, thus personalizing the issue. Third and related to the course theme there's been an outpouring of LGBTQ themed popular culture/mass media, thus helping to globalize many LGBTQ concerns, issues, and topics to a wide variety of people and places. Within the context of these major changes, students will be introduced to a broad range of scholarly and media materials for the study of LGBTQ media and popular culture. Topics covered include: the history of LGBTQ representations in the media; the complexity of LGBTQ visibility in films and documentaries; the role of comedy in LGBTQ media portrayals; representations of LGBTQ intimacy and erotic life; the role of consumer culture in constructing LGBTQ identities; the coming out metaphor in popular culture; the role of social media in fostering LGBTQ activism and community; and media portrayals of transgender/genderqueer identities and bodies. By way of these and other topics, this course provides an opportunity to consider the significant role that media have played in advancing a global transformation on the topic of LGBTQ.

Course #: FSP 163-01
Professor: Rodriguez, Nelson
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

Rodriguez, Nelson Gender
FSP 163-12

All the Rage: perceptions of women's anger

This course will examine social, political and cultural perceptions of women's anger. We will explore contemporary literature, pop culture, social media and other examples of women's rage and how it impacts one's perceptions of women and their impact on society, social movements, politics and relationships. Since the 2016 election, women have been responding with fury. Whether it's #MeToo, "nevertheless, she persisted," Maxine Waters "reclaiming her time," or pussy hats at the Women's March, women and anger have been the topic of many essays, critiques, discussions and news stories. We will look at these examples as they are covered in the newsmedia and discussed by sociologists, activists and public figures. We will look not just at gender, but also race and discuss how identity, stereotypes and cultural norms impact both expression of and perception of anger. We will also discuss the impact (or lack of impact) anger has on social change.

Course #: FSP 163-12
Professor: Tormey, Christina
Day/s & Time/s: R: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Tormey, Christina Gender
FSP 161-44

Resistance in Young Adult Literature

Young adult literature is a breeding ground for stories about rebellion. In this course, we will read several novels that deal with different types of rebellion and discuss how they apply to the TCNJ campus and larger world around us. We'll cover various topics including: how rebellion and activism go hand in hand, how social movements begin, and how fiction can create societal change.

Course #: FSP 161-44
Professor: Anthes, Madeline
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 3:30 PM-4:50 PM

Anthes, Madeline
FSP 161-02

How College Works: Higher Education and American Society

The discussion about college in your family over the last year was personal: which college would you choose (and which ones would choose you), who was going to pay for your education, and what did you intend to study? There is widespread public debate about these issues too. Access to college, the costs of attendance, and the value of a degree are all being questioned by business and nonprofit executives, politicians, and educators. We examine this public debate about higher education; a debate that has intensified as the importance of college for individual success has increased and the resources available for higher education become more scarce.

Course #: FSP 161-02
Professor: Prensky, David
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

Prensky, David
FSP 161-35

The Digital Domain

Is there any aspect of our lives that the Internet and/or digital technology has NOT affected? From how we incessantly connect through text messaging and social media to how we listen to music, study, date, vote, acquire the news and shop, our online and digital interactions are profoundly shaping our daily existence and in turn, ourselves.

Course #: FSP 161-35
Professor: Mazur, Janet
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Mazur, Janet
FSP 163-05

Gender and Citizenship

This course will explore the relationship between gender and citizenship. It will investigate the ways in which citizenship has differed for men, and women (including transgender citizens). Students will study the relationship between citizenship rights, responsibilities and gender roles, as well as issues of sexuality and gender identity. Included in this course will be discussions of the meanings of citizenship, the history of citizenship and current issues in citizenship debates such as immigration.

Course #: FSP 163-05
Professor: Nicolosi, Annmarie
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 8:00 AM-9:20 AM

Nicolosi, Annmarie Gender
FSP 164-20

Human Ability Unplugged

"Disability is not a "brave struggle" or "courage" in the face of adversity . . . disability is an art. It's an ingenious way to live." - Neil Marcus

This quote by Neil Marcus reflects the central focus of this seminar regarding the study of human ability and the struggle among people perceived as more different than alike. Mr. Marcus is a poet, humorist, writer, actor and a self-proclaimed adventurer who is creatively endowed with disability. His disability denies his ability to speak, stand, walk and/or control sudden and bizarre movements. The study of disability as a key aspect of human experience equal with race, class, gender, sex, and sexual orientation will be explored through an alternate postmodern paradigm that views difference from a variety of angles. The course will commence and terminate with an attempt to define "Human-ness" or the parameters of what makes us "human". This will be compared to the human variability that we experience in our societies, communities and civilizations. This study of ability has important political, social, and economic import for society as a whole, including both disabled and non-disabled people. Not only can this can this course of study help elevate the place of people of different abilities within society, but it can also add valuable perspective on a broad range of ideas, issues, and policies.

Students will explore models and theories that examine social, political, cultural, and economic factors that define disability and help determine personal and collective responses to difference. At the same time, coursework will focus on de-stigmatizing disease, illness, and impairment, including those that cannot be measured or explained by biological science. This seminar will be closely aligned to the course of study at TCNJ for students with intellectual disabilities: Career and Community Studies Certificate Program. This is a program (https://ccs.tcnj.edu/) with in the School of Education that implements a post-secondary course of study for a small cohort of youth 18-25 with intellectual disabilities that desire a college experience that leads to adult roles and responsibilities. It is expected that through collaborative and controlled experiences, students in this seminar and the certificate program will jointly benefit from exploring the course themes. In addition, the course will include a variety of instructional methodologies.

Course #: FSP 164-20
Professor: Schuler, Amy
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 AM-10:50 AM

Schuler, Amy Global
FSP 161-26

Applying Statistics to Real Social World

First, although the course demands some statistical thinking, it does not focus on computation, equations, graphs, and calculations. Instead the emphasis is on the solutions of practical everyday issues such as complex social concepts, such as gender, ethnicity, social class, racial inequality, and the relationship between social integration and the use of opiates as tools of understanding today's society. Statistical applications involving equations and or numbers will have a parallel statements and discussions explaining the process in words. Second, this course will equip the students against con men by teaching them the tricks of the trade. The British statesman, Benjamin Disraeli said, "There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies, and statistics," Today more than ever before his statement seems to be very true. The political rhetoric these days reeks of mendacity. You’ll learn about magic of averages, manipulative statistical cherry picking in order to engage a charade; creative graphing to game the system; and you'll be ready for the old adage, "let the buyer beware" that is relevant for today's propaganda masquerading as "information". For social science majors who have hesitations about mathematics, this course will truly prepare you for statistics.

Course #: FSP 161-26
Professor: Ismail, Mohamoud
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

Ismail, Mohamoud
FSP 163-11

Terms of En-QUEER-ment: A history of the movies and LGBTQ identity

Over the past 100 years, the history of coming out at the movies has been a slow process. However, in the 21st century, the presence of LGBTQ characters, stories, writers, directors and performers in movies has become increasingly visible and even politically charged. Issues about sexuality, gender and identity have also been evidenced in other creative arts including music and television, as well. Using a wide range of classic and contemporary movies as texts, this course explores issues of diversity and representation while also looking at what LGBTQ themes contribute to our understanding of contemporary culture and social justice. What unique perspectives, stories and experiences do these films and filmmakers offer us and how do they tell a different story through film? Film screenings will be paired with readings, written assignments and presentations that enhance our critical thinking about controversial issues.

Course #: FSP 163-11
Professor: Amtzis, Alan
Day/s & Time/s: T: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Amtzis, Alan Gender
FSP 164-16

What is a "democracy" anyway?

What is “democracy” anyway? Democracy (from the Ancient Greek demokratia) is a generic term, which is applied today to many dissimilar political systems. Unlike philosophers and political leaders in the past, today many proclaim their love for “democracy”, but what does this concept entail? We will examine the idea of democracy through a collection of texts as varied as an ancient Greek play, Machiavelli, the Federalist papers, movies and articles of contemporary writers. In this course we will explore topics such as: the birth of democracy in Ancient Greece, comparison between Greek democracy and the Roman republic, the relationship between the flourishing of the individual and the political community, the connections between democracy and imperialism, democracy and liberalism.

Course #: FSP 164-16
Professor: Chiekova, Dobrinka
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

Chiekova, Dobrinka Global
FSP 162-12

Multicultural NYC

Is New York really the capital of the world? How did it become such a great multicultural city? What does it mean to be a New Yorker? These are some of the essential questions that will guide us as we study the events that shaped New York's multicultural history from its beginnings to the present. As we explore different periods of the city's history some of the areas we will focus on are immigration, changing neighborhoods, crime, technology, quality of life, money, power, culture and art. Our course time will be divided between lectures/presentations, in-class discussion, and real world experiences. Each student will explore course themes through several NYC neighborhoods.

Course #: FSP 162-12
Professor: Winkel, Matthew
Day/s & Time/s: R: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Winkel, Matthew Race & Ethnicity
FSP 162-04

Incarceration Nation: The Literature of the Prison

This course will explore the literature by and about prisoners from 600 AD to the present. Interdisciplinary in nature, this seminar will weave together the studies of gender, criminology, psychology, sociology, history and culture. We will read provocative, groundbreaking texts written by one of the most neglected, silenced, but all-too-critical sectors of our population, the incarcerated.

Course #: FSP 162-04
Professor: Tarter, Michele
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 9:30 AM-10:50 AM

Tarter, Michele Race & Ethnicity
FSP 161-41

Emotional Skills Literacy

This course will provide students with opportunities to explore and develop their emotional intelligence and fluency. Through readings, class discussions and course assignments, students will be encouraged to explore different aspects of their emotional lives including triggers, coping style, habituated responses, genetic predispositions and affective tolerance. Students will learn to orient to their emotions in new and exciting ways by practicing a mindfulness based approach to emotional intelligence and personal development. The notion of emotions as conveyors of valuable messages will be reviewed, in addition to how emotions are generated and processed in the brain and body. Emotional hijacking will be explored, as well as the concept of state shifting. Important interpersonal skills will be fostered throughout the course dialogue including self-awareness, perspective-taking, empathic listening and assertive self-expression.

Course #: FSP 161-41
Professor: Zamel, Pamela
Day/s & Time/s: R: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Zamel, Pamela
FSP 162-07

CRASH! Exploring the Foundations & Collisions of Our Racial Stories

What is my racial identity? Where did it come from? How does it influence the way I connect with people like me and people from other racial groups? In this class we explore these and other questions about racial identity beginning with our collective personal stories about race.  We will utilize research, readings, and various forms of media to delve into the psychology, sociology, and history of topics such as institutional racism, implicit bias, critical race theory and race-relations in America. We will all fasten our seats belts because this might be a bumpy ride!

Course #: FSP 162-07
Professors: Anthony, Helene & Leake, Brenda
Day/s & Time/s: M: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Anthony, Helene & Leake, Brenda Race & Ethnicity
FSP 161-32

Mindhunters: What Really Makes A Murderer?

This course will utilize existing literature, lectures, and extensive class discussion to theoretically analyze extreme deviant behavior; specifically serial murder. The course will explore the psychosocial motivations of serial murderers, as well as how their media depiction often intensifies the cultural appetite for more information. The course will begin by briefly establishing a foundational knowledge of the reality of serial homicide in the United States and across the globe, inspect the difference between a psychopath and sociopath, and explore the typology (Holmes) and myths of serial killers. Class periods will be utilized for intense discussion surrounding the readings, as well as student discussion around their own comprehensive case study research.

Course #: FSP 161-32
Professor: Gallus, Elizabeth
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Gallus, Elizabeth
FSP 164-02

Teaching English in Local & Global Communities

This course provides students with the theoretical knowledge and practical skills needed for success in English as a Second or Foreign Language settings in the United States and abroad. Students learn how to teach grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and the full range of literacy skills to audiences ranging from children in English immersion kindergartens in Taiwan to adults in an evening program in New Jersey. Students also learn to create curriculum that meets the needs of such diverse audiences. The course includes 25 hours of observation and field experience in informal English teaching settings, e.g. after-school programs, on-campus programs for English language learners, programs for immigrants and refugees, etc.

Course #: FSP 164-02
Professors: Carroll, Stuart & Lopes-Murphy, Solange
Day/s & Time/s: M: 5:00 PM-6:20 PM

Carroll & Lopes-Murphy, Stuart & Solange Global
FSP 164-18

Global Issues Local Impacts

Many problems that contemporary societies face are intellectually challenging and unlikely to be solved by a one person or one disciplinary approach. This course aims to help students to recognize the difficulty of such issues, to give them the skills to recognize and begin to address global problems, to understand the value of cross-cultural collaboration, and to help them communicate across borders and cultures. The course will examine approaches to studying the world and emphasize hands-on experience while focusing on global issues at the local level as a way to provide a foundation for understanding and participating in local change that will have global impact. The focus will be on on global problems and challenges common to all people, and students will be challenged to develop interdisciplinary perspectives, problem-solving abilities, collaborative skills, an appreciation of difference, and leadership abilities. These skills will be strengthened by community engagement activities in Trenton during the fall semester. Students will see firsthand the effects of people who are affected by global challenges like poverty, religious conflict, immigration, discrimination, and economic decline. In the process, they will learn how personal experiences are connected to universal ones, so that they can understand perspectives different than their own, and learn to communicate effectively across cultural barriers.

Course #: FSP 164-18
Professor: Bateup, Joanne
Day/s & Time/s: TR: 5:30 PM-6:50 PM

Bateup, Joanne Global
FSP 161-37

Leaders Are Made, Not Born: Leadership Development at TCNJ

The class is designed to engage participants in recognizing and developing their leadership potential in themselves, the college, and their community. The course includes the study of leadership and application of leadership theories, concepts, and skills. Students will gain a better understanding of their own leadership potential through leadership assessments, exploration of values, and skill development. This interactive class will be looking at leadership through a variety of stories, readings, videos, and activities. At the end of the course, we hope that you have gained the skills to become a better student leader and to actively engage in and impact the College community.

Course #: FSP 161-37
Professor: Rana, Avani
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 AM-10:50 AM

Rana, Avani
FSP 161-08

Alice's Adventures in the Wonderland of Philosophy, Politics, and Economics.

Alice's Adventures in Wonderland isn't just a children's fantasy story--it's a wild ride through some of the most fascinating issues in philosophy, politics, and economics. The Cheshire Cat's trick of gradually fading away raises questions of personal identity, the Mad Hatter's Tea party is based on Plato's discussion of what makes an act moral, and the race that Alice organizes for the wet animals is a criticism of democracy. Even the original illustrations refer to ideas: The pictures of the Mad Hatter show that he hasn't learned the economic advantages of specialization or the benefits of global trade. These issues were deliberately smuggled into the text by the author, Lewis Carroll--who was actually Charles Dodgson, a professor of mathematical logic. This course will explore these and other issues, through the novel, contemporary readings--and games!

Course #: FSP 161-08
Professor: Taylor, James
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Taylor, James
FSP 161-04

It's going to get a lot worse: Science vs Society

This course content has been selected to reframe classical genetics considering recent discoveries and modern molecular tools that have revolutionized our understanding of biology. In class, work will focus on learning the technical aspects that surround hot-button topics such as assisted reproductive technology, genetics of complex diseases and psychological disorders, next-generation sequencing, therapeutic cloning, stem cells, sequencing of the human genome, CRISPR/Cas9, among others. The writing assignments will allow students to intensely explore the technical, social, legal, financial, and ethical issues of that have been created by unparalleled access to biological data. This course will begin with the basics of genetic analysis and no prior knowledge of any discipline is assumed. At the conclusion of the course, students should have the framework to understand the complex interactions between science and society and become better-informed citizens.

Course #: FSP 161-0
Professor: Nayak, Sudhir
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 9:30 AM-10:50 AM

Nayak, Sudhir
FSP 161-01

Quest for Happiness- An Exploration of Well-being in Daily Life

What defines happiness? This course is a guided approach to navigating many facets of “happiness” through daily well-being including physical, emotional, social, intellectual, financial and spiritual aspects of life as a young adult. The objective of this course aims to explore what a “happy life” really means. Topics focus on emphasizing the importance of maintaining a healthy life style (physical), acknowledging psychological needs and challenges (emotional), establishing a positive relationship with family and the community (social), developing a strong sense of fiscal responsibility (financial), being open mind to new ideas (intellectual) and recognizing purpose, value and the meaning of life (spiritual). It is the hope of this course that students will leave this course with a deeper and mindful understanding about the meaning of a “happy life” as they move forward as an undergraduate student and beyond.

Course #: FSP 161-01
Professor: Chiang, Bih-Horng
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

Chiang, Bih-Horng
FSP 161-17

Star Wars: Films & Adaptations

Star Wars: Films & Adaptations examines the original movie trilogy (Episodes IV, V, VI) as well as the prequels (I, II, III), and other Star Wars films released since Disney purchased Lucasfilm.. We also read one Star Wars novel, watch selected episodes of the Star Wars animated TV series (both Clone Wars series and Star Wars Rebels), and read about and discuss other ancillary creations (e.g. video games, collectibles, Jediism) that make up the Star Wars cultural phenomenon. Our approach is interdisciplinary: film studies, literature, philosophy, religious studies, history, sociology, anthropology, economics/marketing, other. The primary sources analyzed are the fictional works created by George Lucas and others; secondary sources include books and articles in a variety of disciplines. The final project is a research paper on a topic related to Star Wars. If you haven't already watched all the films, please do so over the summer since we won't be able to avoid spoilers in our reading and discussion.

Course #: FSP 161-17
Professor: Konkle, Lincoln
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

Konkle, Lincoln
FSP 164-21

The Stories Behind Our Food

Almost two hundred years ago, French attorney, politician and gastronome Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin wrote, "Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you what you are." In this course, we will consider the connections both past and present between what we eat and who we are and examine how our food and eating choices have shaped and preserved individual and cultural identities throughout history. We will investigate the power and meaning of food using historical, sociological, social-anthropological, and political lenses. We will explore where our food comes from, what makes “good” food good (e.g., healthy, ethical, culturally authentic, tasty, etc.), and consider issues of food justice and food ethics. Through critical reading of academic and popular literature, thoughtful viewing of visual materials, classroom discussion, and community engaged learning, we will take a broad look at the stories of our food.

Course #: FSP 164-21
Professor: Roe, Lisa
Day/s & Time/s: W: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Roe, Lisa Global
FSP 164-12

Art of Happiness from a Buddhist Perspective

This seminar seeks to explore the nature and meanings of happiness from a Buddhist perspective. Students will read the basic teachings about happiness from both the Buddhist canons and the contemporary Buddhist thinkers (such as The Dalai Lama, Chögyam Trungpa and Thích Nhất Hạnh). Emphasis will be placed on the key concepts of happiness such as compassion, wisdom, mindfulness, affection, kindness, gratitude, right ethical conducts and mental/emotional cultivation. Students are encouraged to think about what it would mean to live a good and happy life by applying the teachings to their contemporary life and society.

Course #: FSP 164-12
Professor: Mi, Jia-Yan
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

Mi, Jia-Yan Global
FSP 161-05

The Mirror Ball of Stress

This course engages students in thinking more deeply about stress and stressors at personal, interpersonal, institutional and community levels. Through interactive, didactic and evidence-based approaches, students will identify what stress is and is not, explore impacts of stressors on health and well-being of individuals and populations, representing a variety of ethnic, linguistic, age or geographic-specific communities. Particular emphasis will be on impacts of stressors on learning and educational experiences of students, especially as they experience the first weeks and semester of college. Students will have opportunities to explore the many facets of stress with both positive and negative impacts. Guest speakers, current students, college staff and local community members will provide opportunities for students to discuss different perspectives about what stressors people experience and why. Through Canvas Discussion- students will post commentaries as a means of reading and reflecting upon what their peers are thinking or concerned about related to stressors. Students will research and write about stress from multiple sectors, taking into account such aspects as physiology, social-emotional, economic-finance, and political. The course will employ a variety of research-based articles, data and information sources to analyze and interpret the types of impacts stressors. These will include surveys, individual journals, science-based literature, digital or print media.

Course #: FSP 161-05
Professor: Gordon, Karen Allyn
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

Gordon, Karen Allyn
FSP 163-04

Constructions of Race, Gender and Sexuality in Popular American TV

This course will examine American television-from its beginning in the 1950s to current streaming era. The core of this course will be to explore how socially constructed identities are formed and shaped in popular American Television series. Additionally the course will look at how marginalized groups have used TV to expand constructions of these identities. In addition to course readings we will use several television series as texts and employ feminist media and textual analysis methods.

Course #: FSP 163-04
Professor: Adair, Zakiya
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 3:30 PM-4:50 PM

Adair, Zakiya Gender
FSP 161-20

The Arts as a Force for Social Change

In this course we will explore primarily American art activism from the early 20th century to the present to better understand how artists in a variety of genres address social or political injustice and oppression. By taking a close look at major movements of art and protest, we will consider W.E.B. Du Bois' assertion that "all art is propaganda," and the variety of strategies that makers employ to impact the communities in which they work and live. Through inquiry, writing, and presenting, students will develop better questions with which to interrogate concepts like "socially-engaged art" and "creative resistance." By semester's end, students will be able to propose, research, evaluate, and present their own art activist projects. Our study will include a Community Engaged Learning component.

Course #: FSP 161-20
Professor: Deaver, Karen
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

Deaver, Karen
FSP 161-16

Star Wars: Films & Adaptations

Star Wars: Films & Adaptations examines the original movie trilogy (Episodes IV, V, VI) as well as the prequels (I, II, III), and other Star Wars films released since Disney purchased Lucasfilm.. We also read one Star Wars novel, watch selected episodes of the Star Wars animated TV series (both Clone Wars series and Star Wars Rebels), and read about and discuss other ancillary creations (e.g. video games, collectibles, Jediism) that make up the Star Wars cultural phenomenon. Our approach is interdisciplinary: film studies, literature, philosophy, religious studies, history, sociology, anthropology, economics/marketing, other. The primary sources analyzed are the fictional works created by George Lucas and others; secondary sources include books and articles in a variety of disciplines. The final project is a research paper on a topic related to Star Wars. If you haven't already watched all the films, please do so over the summer since we won't be able to avoid spoilers in our reading and discussion.

Course #: FSP 161-16
Professor: Konkle, Lincoln
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Konkle, Lincoln
FSP 161-42

Apocalypse Now

The media is saturated with cries of the apocalypse with news outlets regularly covering religious and astrological doomsday prophets. Survivalists have television shows teaching their skills and zombie movies are frequent box office hits. Our culture both fears and craves the end days. What does this say about humanity and its innate settings? To what extent does fear of the apocalypse mirror uncertainties of our own times? Does this fear represent humanity at its worst, or can it be indicative of the great reaches we can accomplish? This course will explore those questions, and will use fiction, film, and a number of articles as prompts to write about issues such as hope, fear, religion, and perseverance.

Course #: FSP 161-42
Professor: Schmidt, Randy
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Schmidt, Randy
FSP 161-33

Exploring Amish Culture

This course is designed to be an introduction to Amish culture, more specifically, the Old Order Amish, the most conservative group of Amish living in the United States. Through course work designed to acquaint students with a social/ historical/political and educational perspective of the Amish, students will gain a better understanding of this fascinating, complex culture. Resisting change in a technological world is a constant struggle for the Amish who shun electricity, automobiles, and other modern conveniences. Since the Amish eschew individual accomplishment, this course will dwell on the Amish as a "Little Community", how the community is distinct and self-sufficient, how the Amish depend on the resources of the non-Amish community, and how they adapt to change. The course will also clarify some of the major differences between Amish and Mennonite culture, differences that many outsiders are curious about but do not understand. Life ceremonies such as birth, marriage, and death will be investigated as well as social change and illness issues, for example, Amish medical behavior and problems, mental illness, and suicide patterns. Finally, a class trip to Lancaster County, PA to enjoy a wonderful home cooked meal and a hay ride with an Amish family will take place.

Course #: FSP 161-33
Professor: Hornberger, Timothy
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Hornberger, Timothy
FSP 164-25

What's for Dinner - a look at the evolution of food through the ages.

Food is essential for life. It started as a way to obtain the nutrients needed to grow, but also serves a variety of psychological and social needs. This course will explore food patterns and dietary habits from around the world and throughout history to learn about the interplay between food and societies in different social, cultural, environmental and economic contexts. We will examine how what we eat has changed over time due to technological advances such as canning, freezing, microwaving etc. How has “American” versions of food changed from their ethnic origins and why did this occur ? We will also explore additives, allergies, diets, myths, hormones and GMO’s from both a scientific and cultural point of view. We will also examine what we eat through a food journal. A group project/presentation will look a the costs of feeding a family a healthy balanced diet on about $400 a month.

Course #: FSP 164-25
Professor: Bassolino, Donna
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Bassolino, Donna Global
FSP 161-07

Ability and Dis/Ability: Deconstructing and Disrupting the Social and Cultural Gaze

Disability is ubiquitous and permeates literary narratives, medical narratives, films, television, common discourse and other spaces. Disability tends to be subjected to our "gaze" in some way or the other and continually captures our curiosity. Interestingly while it evokes fascination, it also disrupts closely held notions of health, normalcy, ability and the body. This disruption is typically dealt with by finding a way to "reign" in the difference, situate it in a specific space, or identify a rational explanation. Paradoxically, although disability is visible everywhere and evokes our curiosity, it is rendered invisible in other ways. This course is about the social and cultural gaze directed towards disability and what that tells us about our assumptions on binaries such as ability/disability, our notions of body and movement as well as our perceptions of normalcy. The course introduces students to the field of Disability Studies and encourages them to critically examine their gaze and challenge and deconstruct the taken for granted assumptions about disability. The course focuses on how disability is presented in literary narratives, films, as well as other forms of discourse. Issues of agency and citizenship are examined through personal narratives and the accounts of people with disabilities on the web and blogosphere. Embracing an interdisciplinary approach, the course traces the origins of disability studies in the UK and the US and the intersectional conversations with critical studies, feminist disability studies, post colonial disability studies and disability studies in education.

Course #: FSP 161-07
Professor: Rao, Shridevi
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

Rao, Shridevi
FSP 161-21

The Refugee Crisis

This course helps students not only think more deeply about their own cultural identity, but helps them build a framework for understanding one of the most pressing issues of our time, how to manage the greater than 60 million refugees across the world. We will examine the issue from an academic and personal perspective interacting with the local community in Ewing and beyond as we review myriad of sources from poems, to news articles, to journal articles, to works of art. The course will help students understand the complexity of the political and social environments and how they shapes policies which impact refugees, as well as everyday challenges refugees face on their journey and in their assimilation processes. We will examine the crisis from various regional perspectives, including the Middle East, Africa and Central America.

Course #: FSP 161-21
Professor: Becker, Karen
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 3:30 PM-4:50 PM

Becker, Karen
FSP 161-47

Herstory: Creating Original Stories Around Your Stories and Concerns

This course will offer students an opportunity to explore issues important to them. What socio, economic and political events are impacting their choices and their lives? How can they tell their stories in ways that engage dialogue and encourage people to explore multiple points of view? Through oral histories, journaling, theatrical play building and academic research; students will debate, discuss and eventually create theatrical scenes and stories around issues that impact their lives. They will find ways to utilize story-telling to inform, debate and explore ideas from race, gender, economic issues (i.e. student loan debt and minimum wage), stereotypes around politics, age and region. Because theatre offers some aesthetic distance through which to explore challenging issues, this course offers a space to engage. Students will view existing work that has come before now, utilizing these techniques - looking at pieces including "Laramie Project" and "Fires In The Mirror" and other pieces. No theatrical experience is required. Just a sense of play and a willingness to explore and play.

Course #: FSP 161-47
Professor: Little, Jennifer
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 3:30 PM-4:50 PM

Little, Jennifer
FSP 163-09

Communication and Gender

This course explores the relationship between gender and communication. It will explore attitudes and beliefs concerning female and male stereotypes as they are manifested through communication. This course will utilize various tools includes films, in-class exercises, class discussions in both large and small groups and field-study assignments.

Course #: FSP 163-09
Professor: Hallback, Dionne
Day/s & Time/s: T: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Hallback, Dionne Gender
FSP 161-15

The History of Disease

Throughout history, humans have been burdened with countless infectious diseases. Some of these, due to their lethality or their insidious spread, have become legendary. In this course, students examine the societal impact of, and science's response to, history's most significant diseases, including plague, influenza (particular attention to the 1918 Pandemic), tuberculosis, smallpox, polio, cholera, malaria, syphilis, HIV/AIDS and Ebola. 2019 is not without its share of epidemics. We will explore the extent of measles around the world and the second worst epidemic of Ebola that is currently occurring in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Through reading, writing, and class discussions, students explore the effects of each disease on two levels: the biological (microbiology, pharmacology, and immunology) and the societal (epidemiology and sociology). How does disease impact other areas including art and music? Students attempt to understand the biology of each disease while also learning its historical framework. The ethics of infectious disease monitoring and control, including quarantines, mandatory health department notification, and the use of experimental drugs, will also be the subject of classroom discussions. Current events relating to disease that crop up during this semester will be brought into the classroom on a weekly basis.

Course #: FSP 161-15
Professor: King, Rita
Day/s & Time/s: MW: 7:00 PM-8:20 PM

King, Rita
FSP 161-18

Social Justice, Past and Present

What are the characteristics of a just society? What does it mean to say that we have rights? What is the relation between ethical or moral values and religious belief? This seminar compares ancient and medieval ideas about these and related questions with those of the modern world. Discussions will focus on a selection of pre-modern (some very old) and more or less modern writings representative of diverse world views, along with some modern films and news about current events.

Course #: FSP 161-18
Professor: Chazelle, Celia
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Chazelle, Celia
FSP 161-19

Social Justice, Past and Present

What are the characteristics of a just society? What does it mean to say that we have rights? What is the relation between ethical or moral values and religious belief? This seminar compares ancient and medieval ideas about these and related questions with those of the modern world. Discussions will focus on a selection of pre-modern (some very old) and more or less modern writings representative of diverse world views, along with some modern films and news about current events.

Course #: FSP 161-19
Professor: Chazelle, Celia
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

Chazelle, Celia
FSP 164-27

Conspiracy Theory in American Culture & Politics

Conspiracy theories and fringe ideas have long been a significant part of popular discourse when it comes to topics in American culture and politics. From the JFK assassination and the moon landing, to the 9/11 attacks and alleged Trump-Russia collusion in the 2016 election, many of the most captivating events in America's past have become the subject of intense debate over what constitutes historical fact. Popular culture has tended to further notions that contradict the official version of events in these and many other cases of great intrigue. Especially with the proliferation of the internet and social media platforms, people today face the unique and difficult task of separating fact from fiction while evaluating the credibility of sources of news/ information. This course dives into the issues surrounding the perpetuation of conspiracy theories developed from the first half of the 20th Century to the present and how evaluating their validity might be approached. It chronicles the major points of American history that spark the most controversy and evaluates the pros and cons of various analytical/ interpretational approaches. In striking the proper balance between being overly skeptical or impressionable, students will explore the boundaries of their core beliefs and their sense of open-mindedness, while heightening their critical thinking skills across the board. The course will be writing intensive, allowing students to analyze several topics of their own choosing and should be useful to students pursuing any major.

Course #: FSP 164-27
Professor: Arndt, Thomas
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

Arndt, Thomas Global
FSP 161-12

Social Media and Hashtag Activism

The course will explore the impact that social media (SM) has on political decision-making and makers. First, we will establish definitions for such constructs as social media and activism. The course will then trace the origins of hashtag activism and look at some of the most effective examples of social media's influence on policymakers. Our journey includes the various ways social activism is displayed on different SM platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, Snapchat, MarcoPolo, etc), and will include a consideration of the best practices in this area. Students will actively engage in studying a social media activism case on their favorite subject, and they will (theoretically) develop a campaign for SM activism on a topic of strong interest.

Course #: FSP 161-12
Professor: Rouse, LaMont
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

Rouse, LaMont
FSP 164-03

Women and the Family in Modern China

This course examines women's role and family structure as concepts and practices in Chinese culture from the mid-19th century to the present. It studies the impact of social change on women and family life and women's participation in and contribution to social change. Students will gain insights about Chinese society through the study of gender and the family, and about gender and family issues through the study of China. The course format is a combination of short lectures, in-depth discussions, workshops, oral reports, visual presentations (films), role-playing, and other creative activities. The reading materials include primary sources, scholarly works, novels, autobiographies, and journalist reports. The course also offers a community engaged learning experience that will fulfill students' CEL requirements.

Course #: FSP 164-03
Professor: Shao, Qin
Day/s & Time/s: R: 5:30PM-8:20PM

Shao, Qin Global
FSP 163-03

Constructions of Race, Gender and Sexuality in Popular American TV

This course will examine American television-from its beginning in the 1950s to current streaming era. The core of this course will be to explore how socially constructed identities are formed and shaped in popular American Television series. Additionally the course will look at how marginalized groups have used TV to expand constructions of these identities. In addition to course readings we will use several television series as texts and employ feminist media and textual analysis methods.

Course #: FSP 163-03
Professor: Adair, Zakiya
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Adair, Zakiya Gender
FSP 161-28

Ethics and Sustainability of the Global Fashion Industry

Who makes our clothes, how they are made and what impact their production has on our world are all ethical questions related to the 3 trillion-dollar a year global fashion industry. When the production of clothing and textiles was moved in the nineties from the United States to countries where cheaper labor could be found, the cost of clothing to the consumer began to decrease while the human and environmental costs increased dramatically. In this course, we examine how consumer spending on cheap, fast fashion has come at a high cost to people and planet and what can be done to create a more sustainable future for the global fashion industry.

Course #: FSP 161-28
Professor: Webber, Kathleen
Day/s & Time/s: T: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Webber, Kathleen
FSP 161-34

Loving the Alien: The Music and Art of David Bowie

Famous as much for his musical catalog as his expression and manipulation of identity, David Bowie is one of the most influential musicians of the last fifty years. This section of the First Seminar Program will study Bowie's lyrics as works of literature and his creation of meaning through a variety of literary techniques. Through an examination of his work and art, we will come to explore key topics such as: authenticity, alienation, nothing, yearning, and death. We will trace the evolution of the artist from Space Oddity, released in 1969, to Bowie's final album, Black Star, released on Jan. 8, 2016, two days before he died. On this journey, we will also assess Bowie's expression through diverse media platforms, including his multiple identities (Ziggy Stardust, The Thin White Duke, etc.), his music videos, paintings, and acting roles. We will endeavor to uncover how, as philosopher Simon Critchley states, "Through the fakery and because of it, we feel a truth that leads us beyond ourselves, toward the imagination of some other way of being."

Course #: FSP 161-34
Professor: Layton, Shawn
Day/s & Time/s: TR: 5:30 PM-6:50 PM

Layton, Shawn
FSP 162-08

The Evolution of African American Gospel Music

This course traces Black Gospel Music from its origins to its present day varied arrangements. Lectures will include information presented on Black Gospel Music Icons; the various instruments and styles of musical arrangements and more to present the richness and value of this cultural expression. Students come prepared to sing a little (as a group only) and attend at least two worship experiences (i.e., Sunday morning worship and/or a Gospel concert).

Course #: FSP 162-08
Professor: Mccrary, Todd
Day/s & Time/s: M: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Mccrary, Todd Race & Ethnicity
FSP 164-19

History Through Film and Literature

We will explore history through story, both written and on film. Specifically, we will look at the ethnic groups of Africa; and the way they have changed due to influence of the West. Then, we will explore the suffragette movement in both England and the United States during the early 20th century. Finally, we will examine the relationship between the United States and the Taliban. We will read Half of a Yellow Sun, The Firefly Letters, and And The Mountains Echoed. We will watch Long Way Down, Blood Diamond, and Parts Unknown; Iron-Jawed Angels and Suffragette; and Charlie Wilson's War and The Breadwinner. Writing will include reflections, two research papers, and two presentations.

Course #: FSP 164-19
Professor: Raskin, Donna
Day/s & Time/s: TR: 5:30 PM-6:50 PM

Raskin, Donna Global
FSP 161-10

Three American Poets: Whitman, Dickinson, and Hughes

What is the life of a poet in the United States? Does one speak for the people or for oneself? Can one truly speak for others without compromising the self? This seminar examines these questions in looking at the three most influential and perhaps most radical poets in American literary history: Walt Whitman, the Brooklyn roustabout and self-declared "rough" who shocked readers with his candid treatment of the body and sex; Emily Dickinson, the New England rebel who continually questioned the religious orthodoxy of her time; and Langston Hughes, the champion of jazz age Harlem whose insistence on social justice ran him afoul of both Congress and the FBI.

Course #: FSP 161-10
Professor: Blake, David
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 12:30 PM-1:50 PM

Blake, David
FSP 161-27

The Elements of Journalism

Students will explore the foundational principles of journalism as well as the challenges and opportunities confronting news organizations covering Trenton and Mercer County. In collaborative teams, we will create news and editorial products that reflect the principles articulated in the seminal work, The Elements of Journalism (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site., along with critiques and suggestions of ways to build a culturally responsive news ecosystem that fosters broad community engagement and cooperative problem-solving.

Course #: FSP 161-27
Professor: Pearson, Kim
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 9:30 AM-10:50 AM

Pearson, Kim
FSP 164-07

Women Writing the Past: Fiction, History, and Autobiography

This course offers a study of fiction, film, and autobiography by women of color whose work demonstrates the "presence of the past" in late 20th-century life. We will read a sampling of authors who have origins in Jamaica, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, China, and the US for the specific ways in which they construct and reconstruct the past through literature. As we read each text, we will interrogate the myths and legends that have come to be known as "history" and look at the methods, artifacts, and sources each author uses to acquaint readers with imaginative alternatives to "official records" of the past. We will also study the lesser known personal histories of the authors' lives as well as the personal lives of the lesser-known historical figures who are forgotten by the past but "remembered" by the authors.

Course #: FSP 164-07
Professor: Ortiz-Vilarelle, Lisa
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 8:00 AM-9:20 AM

Ortiz-Vilarelle, Lisa Global
FSP 164-09

Women and the Family in Modern China

This course examines women's role and family structure as concepts and practices in Chinese culture from the mid-19th century to the present. It studies the impact of social change on women and family life and women's participation in and contribution to social change. Students will gain insights about Chinese society through the study of gender and the family, and about gender and family issues through the study of China. The course format is a combination of short lectures, in-depth discussions, workshops, oral reports, visual presentations (films), role-playing, and other creative activities. The reading materials include primary sources, scholarly works, novels, autobiographies, and journalist reports. The course also offers a community engaged learning experience that will fulfill students' CEL requirements.

Course #: FSP 164-09
Professor: Shao, Qin
Day/s & Time/s: T: 5:30PM-8:20PM

Shao, Qin Global
FSP 161-03

The Soul of the New Machines: A Passion for Progress

Tracy Kidder's Pulitzer Prize (1981) winning book, "The Soul of a New Machine" became the benchmark for narrative nonfiction works involving technology development. This course will examine Kidder's book as well as three others, which all describe efforts in science and technology that changed history. The focus areas of the books are the microcomputer, genetic engineering, Internet security and high definition television. The common thread in all of these stories is that the new “machines” come from a passion for discovery, innovation and progress.
Each of these books give a highly detailed account of a technological advance, but they are all written for general audiences. Students will be assigned to read one of the four books, and will participate in classroom discussions, writing assignments, peer-editing sessions and presentations. You will take a “deep dive” into the technology involved in your book, and share your newfound knowledge with your classmates. You will also share your insights into the conflicts and triumphs described in your book, and develop a broader theme based on comparisons between the events described in your book and what you learned about the other books from your peers.

Course #: FSP 161-03
Professor: Pearlstein, Larry
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 3:30PM-4:50PM

Pearlstein, Larry
FSP 161-30

I want my MTV! Representations and Memories of the 1980s

This course examines contemporary representations of the moments and icons that defined the 1980s: MTV, Ronald Reagan, “The Breakfast Club,” white youths wanting to “be like Mike” (basketball star Michael Jordan), AIDS, etc. It seeks to not only to appreciate how people of the 1980s saw themselves and their world, but also to grasp the means in which our present-day memories and perceptions of those events are different. The heart of the course will be applying the theories of memory we learned to better understand the meanings contemporaries of the 1980s imputed into movies such as “Back to the Future” and how a song like “Born in the USA” was so often misinterpreted. By the end of the course, you will have both an appreciation of your parents’ generation and the intellectual tools to grasp how the nostalgia of the 1980s is shaped by people trying to make sense of the world in which they lived and live.

Course #: FSP 161-30
Professor: Campo, Joseph
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Campo, Joseph
FSP 164-28

Living Hinduism: Applied consciousness and influence on society and environment

The course introduces to over five thousand year old religious traditions of South Asia that are often labeled as "Hinduism". Representing unusually diverse traditions, Hinduism is the dominant faith in India, and an influential spiritual force around the globe. From the ancient texts and historical and modern philosophical speculations, three primary Hindu paths - ritual, renunciation, and devotion will be discussed. We will look at the influence of practicing this age old traditional knowledge in daily lives and how it raises consciousness/awareness and its effect on society, sustainability, and environment. The course will be augmented with the use of multimedia showcasing movie clips, and field trips along with discussion on modern perspectives.

Course #: FSP 164-28
Professor: Paliwal, Manish
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Paliwal, Manish Global
FSP 161-45

Walt Disney's America

In this course, we will analyze the effect of Walt Disney and the Walt Disney Company on American culture. From the Great Depression into World War Two, and onward through the present day, Disney's stamp on culture is indelible. We will study the films of the Walt Disney Company for their explorations of racial and gender equality (or total lack thereof) as well as propaganda films distributed during World War Two. Other topics will include the change in the American tourism industry, American nostalgia, and how American history is depicted through the works of Disney.

Course #: FSP 161-45
Professor: Hargreaves, Laura
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 3:30 PM-4:50 PM

Hargreaves, Laura
FSP 162-03

Diversity and Its Responses

Living in the United States, it is clear that ethnic and racial diversity matter. However, why diversity matters, what its origins are, and what are appropriate responses to issues of diversity are all questions that have generated differing viewpoints and reactions from scholars, policymakers, theorists and ordinary citizens throughout this country’s history. In this course, we examine what diversity is, what it looks like in the United States, and how individuals, groups and states have responded to ethnic and racial diversity in their midst. We will focus on debates over diversity such as whether race is “real” or not; whether assimilation or pluralism represent ideal goals; and whether policies such as affirmative action are appropriate responses to issues of race and inequality.

Course #: FSP 162-03
Professor: Chartock, Sarah
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Chartock, Sarah Race & Ethnicity
FSP 164-23

Histories of the Future

Our visions of the future exist in contested territory. Will it be jet-packs and food in pill form? Or will the future be a post-apocalyptic wasteland? Our thoughts about the future are fraught with our hopes, fears, aspirations, and fantasies about the present. The future is, in other words, a contested thing because it depends on our visions of the present. This FSP bring together various stories, images, and ideas from imagined futures both past and present. Some of the cases will provide utopian dreams, others, dystopian warnings, but they all provide context that will allow us to explore the past using the histories of the future. This course will provide students a conceptual toolkit for thinking about the forces (be they social, cultural, or intellectual) that create narratives of the future, and will allow them to better understand the meanings we give to our own futures.

Course #: FSP 164-23
Professor: Pierri, Florencia
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 8:00 AM-9:20 AM

Pierri, Florencia Global
FSP 161-29

Complementary and Alternative Medicine

This course explores what constitutes the traditional approach to medical care in the United States, and several alternative approaches. Some are common in the US (chiropractic, physical therapy, mental-health counseling), or ascendant (nutrition, supplements, acupuncture), and some much more in other countries (naturopathic, probiotics). The course builds an understanding of a holistic approach to health and illness, including side effects as well as direct effects, and includes long-term consequences as well as short-term benefits of health interventions. 1 course unit, no prerequisites.

Course #: FSP 161-29
Professor: Naples, Michele
Day/s & Time/s: T: 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

Naples, Michele
FSP 164-17

Human Ability Unplugged

“Disability is not a 'brave struggle’ or 'courage in the face of adversity’ . . . disability is an art. It’s an ingenious way to live.” – Neil Marcus – This quote by Neil Marcus reflects the central focus of this seminar regarding the study of human ability and the struggle among people perceived as more different than alike. Mr. Marcus is a poet, humorist, writer, actor and a self proclaimed adventurer who is creatively endowed with disability. His disability denies his ability to speak, stand, walk and/or control sudden and bizarre movements. The study of disability as a key aspect of human experience equal with race, class, gender, sex, and sexual orientation is explored through an alternate post modern paradigm that views difference from a variety of angles. The course commences and terminates with an attempt to define “Human-ness” or the parameters of what makes us “human.” This is compared to the human variability that we experience in our societies, communities and civilizations. This study of ability has important political, social, and economic import for society as a whole, including both disabled and non-disabled people.

Course #: FSP 164-17
Professor: Petroff, Jerry
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 9:30 AM-10:50 AM

Petroff, Jerry Global
FSP 163-14

#Hashtagging Feminism: How Black Women have Transformed Digital Spaces

This course will explore how black women have revolutionized digital spaces and transformed how we think about activism, academia, and feminist theory. We will start with an analysis of cyber spaces and philosophies surrounding social media, social media practice, and identity then move to in-depth explorations of specific social media movements started by notable activists Zerlina Maxwell, Feminista Jones, April Reign, Tarana Burke, and many others. We will examine how oppression manifests in the social world, how theory becomes practice through social media activism and etiquette, and how media movements underscore and challenge feminist theory.

Course #: FSP 163-14
Professor: Sekanics, Jennie
Day/s & Time/s: M: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Sekanics, Jennie Gender
FSP 164-04

Iran through Film and Literature

Beyond the soundbites of popular media and political rhetoric, which commonly portray Iran in a negative context (extremist, threatening, backward, etc.) how much do you really know about the history, politics, culture and society of modern Iran or Iranian society today? This interdisciplinary course will use the lens of film, literature and history to move beyond western media-based images to gain a more grounded understanding of the history of modern Iran through the eyes of those who have experienced it. Over the course of the semester we will examine issues concerning Islam, politics, revolution, gender, modernization, marginality, exile, youth culture, and dissent through discussing background historical readings side by side with novels and memoirs, films, and music. Students will have the opportunity to develop analytical skills through essay writing, oral presentations, and class discussions, and will carry out independent research to produce a creative final project that speaks to the visual power of the image and the textual power of the word. We will also visit the Gray Art Gallery of New York University where we will meet with the curator and view a selection of their collection of modern Iranian paintings, graphic art and sculpture.

Course #: FSP 164-04
Professor: Gross, Jo-Ann
Day/s & Time/s: R: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Gross, Jo-Ann Global
FSP 162-11

Leadership for Social Justice

This interactive course examines the critical role of leadership in advancing social justice, with emphasis on successful and failed efforts to address social problems such as poverty, oppression, and the fight for civil rights in America. Together we will probe and critically evaluate several theories and models that attempt to define effective leadership for the public good. We will also engage in an evidence-based, case-study analysis of selected leaders, including famous and lesser known social justice activists, political leaders, and social entrepreneurs, in order to investigate the values, traits, and competencies associated with effective and ineffective social justice leadership. Texts and supplemental readings include non-fiction and fictional works examining root causes of social injustice, and the efforts of leaders to produce positive social change.

Course #: FSP 162-11
Professor: Scarpati, Antonino
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

Scarpati, Antonino Race & Ethnicity
FSP 163-07

Sequential Art and the Storytelling Space: Trauma in Comics

Once considered an unconventional medium, comics are now used to define more difficult retellings of traumatic narratives by helping their protagonists break away from a traditional storytelling space. When discussing trauma, the use of iconic images and panel closure help illustrate the social constructs of gender performance, physically and emotionally "closed" spaces, and the image of resiliency as the hero to our own story. Every superhero story begins with a traumatic origin story, but today, trauma has become a focal point in the way the hero interacts with other characters and makes ethical decisions. The effects of illustrating these traumatic storylines through the sequential art of panels or scenes addresses what we, the audience, are looking for when we engage in the hero mythos. In this course, we will engage in comic reading and academic scholarship as we ask ourselves: Do the growing pains that come with building a global community dictate which heroes are seen as having worthy stories to tell? If so, what makes a compelling superhero story? Can heroes provide us with an agency to make choices and to understand the nuances of privilege, heroism, and strength through gender, race, and sexual orientation? Through graphic novels, comic strips, and film/TV adaptations, we will focus on the different types of trauma that is found within comic book narratives and how they relate to our current cultural norms and social scripts. Together, we will analyze the many forms of sequential art, from traditional superhero stories to graphic novel memoirs to comics as activism.

Course #: FSP 163-07
Professor: Atzeni, Samantha
Day/s & Time/s: MW: 5:30 PM-6:50 PM

Atzeni, Samantha Gender
FSP 162-13

The Evolution of African American Gospel Music

This course traces Black Gospel Music from its origins to its present day varied arrangements. Lectures will include information presented on Black Gospel Music Icons; the various instruments and styles of musical arrangements and more to present the richness and value of this cultural expression. Students come prepared to sing a little (as a group only) and attend at least two worship experiences (i.e., Sunday morning worship and/or a Gospel concert).

Course #: FSP 162-13
Professor: Mccrary, Todd
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 8:00 AM-9:20 AM

Mccrary, Todd Race & Ethnicity
FSP 161-11

Three American Poets: Whitman, Dickinson, and Hughes

What is the life of a poet in the United States? Does one speak for the people or for oneself? Can one truly speak for others without compromising the self? This seminar examines these questions in looking at the three most influential and perhaps most radical poets in American literary history: Walt Whitman, the Brooklyn roustabout and self-declared "rough" who shocked readers with his candid treatment of the body and sex; Emily Dickinson, the New England rebel who continually questioned the religious orthodoxy of her time; and Langston Hughes, the champion of jazz age Harlem whose insistence on social justice ran him afoul of both Congress and the FBI.

Course #: FSP 161-11
Professor: Blake, David
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

Blake, David
FSP 162-05

Incarceration Nation: The Literature of the Prison

This course will explore the literature by and about prisoners from 600 AD to the present. Interdisciplinary in nature, this seminar will weave together the studies of gender, criminology, psychology, sociology, history and culture. We will read provocative, groundbreaking texts written by one of the most neglected, silenced, but all-too-critical sectors of our population, the incarcerated.

Course #: FSP 162-05
Professor: Tarter, Michele
Day/s & Time/s: TF: 11:00 AM-12:20 PM

Tarter, Michele Race & Ethnicity
FSP 163-02

LGBTQ and Popular Culture

This course explores LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer) identity, culture, and politics by way of their representations in popular and independent films/documentaries, as well as in other forms of mass media. I often share with students that there are at least three major reasons for why there's been a significant shift globally in terms of pro LGBTQ civil and human rights. First, many anti-gay laws are being challenged and repealed (e.g., anti-gay marriage laws). Second, many people now personally know friends, family members, and co-workers who identify as LGBTQ, thus personalizing the issue. Third and related to the course theme there's been an outpouring of LGBTQ themed popular culture/mass media, thus helping to globalize many LGBTQ concerns, issues, and topics to a wide variety of people and places. Within the context of these major changes, students will be introduced to a broad range of scholarly and media materials for the study of LGBTQ media and popular culture. Topics covered include: the history of LGBTQ representations in the media; the complexity of LGBTQ visibility in films and documentaries; the role of comedy in LGBTQ media portrayals; representations of LGBTQ intimacy and erotic life; the role of consumer culture in constructing LGBTQ identities; the coming out metaphor in popular culture; the role of social media in fostering LGBTQ activism and community; and media portrayals of transgender/genderqueer identities and bodies. By way of these and other topics, this course provides an opportunity to consider the significant role that media have played in advancing a global transformation on the topic of LGBTQ.

Course #: FSP 163-02
Professor: Rodriguez, Nelson
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

Rodriguez, Nelson Gender
FSP 161-14

Pixar: Artistry & Innovation

Writer Arthur C. Clarke postulated that "any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic." For over two decades, Pixar Animation Studios has produced works of cinematic magic — breakthrough artistry made possible by incredible leaps in technological advancement. To date, Pixar has released 20 feature-length films and dozens of short films that have delighted audiences, won top accolades, earned billions of dollars, and pushed the creative and technical boundaries of CGI filmmaking (a genre that was literally invented by Pixar with its 1995 Toy Story). In this course, we will use Pixar as a case study example of the symbiotic interplay of technological innovation and artistic expression. Through a series of readings, we will the examine the evolution of this groundbreaking and unconventional company, and draw parallels with the explosive proliferation of computing technology in the latter 20th century. We'll trace Pixar from its humble origins in the 1970s as the Computer Graphics Laboratory, to its development in the 1980s as a division of Lucasfilm and emergence as an independent company, to its later partnership with and ultimate acquisition by Disney. We will critically examine a number of Pixar's works to discuss their technological underpinnings, as well as their cultural and artistic significance. We will also use materials from the online "Pixar in a Box" series to learn about the process of filmmaking and CGI animation, and will explore how to model with computer software tools and engineering rapid prototyping equipment.

Course #: FSP 161-14
Professor: Cathell, Matthew
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

Cathell, Matthew
FSP 164-14

What's on our plate? Critical explorations of food access and place

We will explore food consumption, production, and equity of access in various locations. Participants will analyze the role that place plays in production and access to food through course assignments, readings, and field trips. We will investigate our own consumption practices and map food production and access across local and global communities. Applying a critical place-based lens to our relationship with food and place, students will develop deeper understandings of structural, historical, social and economic forces that influence what ends up on an individual's plate. Alternative approaches to food production and consumption will be explored as students critique cultural practices, policies and their own role in the diverse food production systems. Students will be introduced to participatory research skills and methods.

Course #: FSP 164-14
Professors: Bellino, Marissa & Burroughs, Greer
Day/s & Time/s: T: 5:30 PM-8:20 PM

Bellino, Marissa & Burroughs, Greer Global
FSP 164-06

Morality, God, and Free Will

This seminar is about what it means to be human. Most people believe that there are moral rights and wrongs and a God (or gods) who cares about human moral conduct. They also believe that they themselves are “persons,” (intelligent selves, souls, or agents) who are continuous in time and have the free will to choose among alternative future possibilities. Yet few things are more difficult to substantiate than fundamental beliefs about morality, God, selfhood, and free will. We will examine and discuss the views of philosophers, religious thinkers, and contemporary scientists.

Course #: FSP 164-06
Professor: Kamber, Richard
Day/s & Time/s: MR: 2:00 PM-3:20 PM

Kamber, Richard Global
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